Proposal Abstract

This session will describe a faculty member's process of revising the teaching of a senior capstone course in education. The objective of the course redesign was to better engage students and push them to critically examine their discipline and then apply this authentic disciplinary knowledge. Research was then conducted on the pedagogical process to determine the success of the new course design in achieving its objectives. The research project documented: how the authentic disciplinary practices were taught to students; student attitudes toward the knowledge gained; and how the students subsequently put this knowledge into practice. Results and implications for further revision of the course based on the evidence gathered will be shared. The audience will be asked to share examples from their own teaching practice of how this model of evidence-based research into the improvement of teaching effectiveness and student learning outcomes might be applied in other disciplines.

Full Proposal

This session will describe a faculty member’s process of revising the teaching of a senior capstone course. The course design and teaching were re-conceptualized in order for the students to learn and then apply their disciplinary knowledge in the most authentic way possible. New objectives for student learning outcomes were developed, and research was then conducted on the pedagogical process to determine the success of the new course design in achieving its objectives.

In order to gather evidence about how the teaching process impacted student learning, a research project documented: how the authentic disciplinary practices were taught to students; student attitudes toward the knowledge gained; and how the students subsequently put this knowledge into practice. Students’ attitudes and levels of use of the knowledge were measured using a modification of Hall and Dossett’s Concerns- Based Adoption Model through student surveys, interviews, and artifact analysis of student work. Results will be shared, and implications for further revision of the course based on the evidence gathered, and for using similar processes in other scholarly disciplines will be discussed.

The course described prepares secondary teacher candidates to authentically apply their knowledge in the performance setting of a high school classroom. Through scholarly inquiry, the course was re-conceptualized based on research previously done by the professor on professional development activities for secondary teachers. The process shown to improve the teaching of the in-service teachers was then extended to the preservice students. The objective of the course redesign was to better engage the students and push them to critically examine their discipline, and then apply this authentic disciplinary knowledge in their practice through assignments during the course and subsequently during their student teaching practicum experience.

The objectives of this session are for those attending to be able to use the ideas shared to undertake their own scholarly inquiry in two areas: re-conceptualizing the teaching of one of their courses to increase student gains in authentic knowledge and practice; and conducting research in their classrooms to verify the success of the re-conceptualized course design and the new pedagogical methods used. The audience will be asked to share examples from their own teaching practice of how this model of evidence-based research into the improvement of teaching effectiveness and student learning outcomes might be applied in other disciplines. Examples of the survey, interview, and artifact analysis instruments used to examine the results of the redesigned course will be shared.

Location

Room 2905 A/B

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Nov 1st, 11:00 AM Nov 1st, 11:45 AM

Re-Conceptualizing Teaching to Engage Students with Authentic Disciplinary Practices

Room 2905 A/B

This session will describe a faculty member's process of revising the teaching of a senior capstone course in education. The objective of the course redesign was to better engage students and push them to critically examine their discipline and then apply this authentic disciplinary knowledge. Research was then conducted on the pedagogical process to determine the success of the new course design in achieving its objectives. The research project documented: how the authentic disciplinary practices were taught to students; student attitudes toward the knowledge gained; and how the students subsequently put this knowledge into practice. Results and implications for further revision of the course based on the evidence gathered will be shared. The audience will be asked to share examples from their own teaching practice of how this model of evidence-based research into the improvement of teaching effectiveness and student learning outcomes might be applied in other disciplines.