Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Education & Learning - STEM Education

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Robert Mayes (Georgia Southern University)

Lisa Watson (Georgia Southern University)

Abstract

The overarching goal of the Institute for Interdisciplinary STEM Education (iå_STEMe) at Georgia Southern University is to improve student engagement and learning outcomes in STEM courses through immersion in authentic, real-world, problem-based and place-based educational settings. To accomplish this goal, iå_STEMe has partnered with 10 middle and high schools located in Georgia to incorporate a series of reasoning modalities developed to meet the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) to develop STEM literate citizens capable of making informed decisions, and to open up opportunities to fill the growing need for STEM professionals. The reasoning modalities developed are Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), Computational Reasoning (CR), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), Scientific Model-based Reasoning (SMR), and Engineering Design-based Reasoning (EDR). CAS reasoning is the overarching ability to address real-world problems that are often embedded in complex systems. CR focuses on the methods computer scientists use to make sense of data and solve complex problems. Numerous elements alongside programming have been identified as integral to the development of CR skills. QR focuses on quantifying real-world problems that are often complex and ill-defined. SMR reflects the NGSS identification of model-based reasoning as an essential ability that must be taught explicitly. SMR simulates the real-world through the input of quantitative and qualitative data gathered during formal experimentation into visual scientific models. EDR is the result of the pressing need for future engineers to meet the demands of the national workforce. As a result, the NGSS calls for greater student engagement and exposure to the engineering design process. Each reasoning modality is defined by an assortment of modality-specific conceptual elements. These conceptual elements were devised to capture the defining traits of a given modality, and help guide teacher practice and student learning. Each of the identified reasoning modalities correspond to a particular area of STEM (Science, Technology, Education, Math) while reframing student inquiry as an interdisciplinary exploration of complex real-world problems. Through the utilization of the varying reasoning modalities, Real STEM is examining the impact of interdisciplinary STEM on teacher practice and student ability to engage in 21st century reasoning. Currently, iå_STEMe is engaged in a series of on-going literature reviews to continue developing and strengthening the theoretical underpinnings of each modality. Thus far, pre- and post- data collected through the ALSQ student assessment for the fall of 2015 shows positive growth in student engagement as well as growth in interest in STEM fields after exposure to the assorted reasoning modalities. Student participants reported significant improvement in intrinsic motivation (p < .001), self-management/self-regulation (p < .001), and intent to persist in RealSTEM (p < .001). These results align with iå_STEMe core mission to develop students‰Ûª abilities to reason critically using STEM principles and the identified 21st century reasoning modalities while fostering a sense of confidence to make informed decisions and increase interest in STEM professions.

Keywords

Georgia Southern University, Research Symposium, STEM, 21st century, Reasoning modalities, Interdisciplinary, Education

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

4-16-2016 4:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 2:45 PM Apr 16th, 4:00 PM

21st Century Reasoning Modalities In Interdisciplinary STEM Education

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

The overarching goal of the Institute for Interdisciplinary STEM Education (iå_STEMe) at Georgia Southern University is to improve student engagement and learning outcomes in STEM courses through immersion in authentic, real-world, problem-based and place-based educational settings. To accomplish this goal, iå_STEMe has partnered with 10 middle and high schools located in Georgia to incorporate a series of reasoning modalities developed to meet the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) to develop STEM literate citizens capable of making informed decisions, and to open up opportunities to fill the growing need for STEM professionals. The reasoning modalities developed are Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), Computational Reasoning (CR), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), Scientific Model-based Reasoning (SMR), and Engineering Design-based Reasoning (EDR). CAS reasoning is the overarching ability to address real-world problems that are often embedded in complex systems. CR focuses on the methods computer scientists use to make sense of data and solve complex problems. Numerous elements alongside programming have been identified as integral to the development of CR skills. QR focuses on quantifying real-world problems that are often complex and ill-defined. SMR reflects the NGSS identification of model-based reasoning as an essential ability that must be taught explicitly. SMR simulates the real-world through the input of quantitative and qualitative data gathered during formal experimentation into visual scientific models. EDR is the result of the pressing need for future engineers to meet the demands of the national workforce. As a result, the NGSS calls for greater student engagement and exposure to the engineering design process. Each reasoning modality is defined by an assortment of modality-specific conceptual elements. These conceptual elements were devised to capture the defining traits of a given modality, and help guide teacher practice and student learning. Each of the identified reasoning modalities correspond to a particular area of STEM (Science, Technology, Education, Math) while reframing student inquiry as an interdisciplinary exploration of complex real-world problems. Through the utilization of the varying reasoning modalities, Real STEM is examining the impact of interdisciplinary STEM on teacher practice and student ability to engage in 21st century reasoning. Currently, iå_STEMe is engaged in a series of on-going literature reviews to continue developing and strengthening the theoretical underpinnings of each modality. Thus far, pre- and post- data collected through the ALSQ student assessment for the fall of 2015 shows positive growth in student engagement as well as growth in interest in STEM fields after exposure to the assorted reasoning modalities. Student participants reported significant improvement in intrinsic motivation (p < .001), self-management/self-regulation (p < .001), and intent to persist in RealSTEM (p < .001). These results align with iå_STEMe core mission to develop students‰Ûª abilities to reason critically using STEM principles and the identified 21st century reasoning modalities while fostering a sense of confidence to make informed decisions and increase interest in STEM professions.