Title

Supporting Children of Substance Abusing Parents

Focused Area

Improving School Climate for Youth-At-Risk

Relevance to Focused Area

New Hampshire is in the midst of a heroin epidemic. Amongst this epidemic are the youth feeling the impacts of their parent and loved ones use. Not only does substance abuse impact the on using but the family as a whole, mainly children. As a school we see the impacts of this daily. Children lack the services necessary to thrive within a household impacted by substance use. We as a school are coming together to find ways to support these children so not only are basic needs being met they are able to be successful academically.

Primary Strand

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance to Primary Strand

The link aimed to direct to primary strands is not working.

Children of Substance Abusing parents are youth at risk. They are at risk for become substance users themselves or acting out. As educators we need to work to not only understand this population but support them.

Brief Program Description

According to No Safe Have: Children of Substance Abusing Parents, children whose parents abuse alcohol and other drugs are almost 3 times likelier to be physically or sexually assaulted and more than 4 times likelier to be neglected by their parents compared to children of parents who are not substance abusers. In the midst of our current crisis this is often an over looked population which does not receive the resources necessary to thrive. Come join us for a discussion highlighting what we do to better support these youth.

Summary

According to No Safe Have: Children of Substance Abusing Parents, children whose parents abuse alcohol and other drugs are almost 3 times likelier to be physically or sexually assaulted and more than 4 times likelier to be neglected by their parents compared to children of parents who are not substance abusers. Along with the increase likelihood of abuse this population may experience the death or incarceration of a parent leaving them in the care of the state or other guardian. Often these children need more support than those whose parents are not using. This leaves us trying to figure out how we can support these youth with a limited amount of resources. Addiction often becomes a family secret or something that children are afraid to talk about. As adults we need create a safe place for these children to talk about what is happening so we can begin to support them in dealing with a parent’s addiction.

As a result of participating in this session participants will be able to better:

List ways a community can provide support to children of substance abusing parents. Utilize information provided within session to begin to create a plan to support children of substance abusing parents Describe why it is important to provide support and resources to children of substance abusing parents

Evidence

Since obtaining the Safe Schools Healthy Students grant we have been able to implement programming to support at risk youth. Students are self-reporting feeling safer at school and feeling as though their needs are being better met. Studies have revealed children of addicted parents are the group of children most at risk of becoming developing an alcohol or drug problem due to many factors. Since the implementation of the grant within our school district the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (2015) shows a decrease in student drug and alcohol use.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Nicole is currently working with youth under the Safe Schools/ Healthy Students grant within the Rochester School District. It has been her passion to prevent youth substance abuse and having working to do so since 2008. Prior to this Nicole worked with at risk youth as a program coordinator for a youth diversion program. She obtained her MSW from the University of New England. Outside of work, Nicole enjoys spending time with her two year old daughter and nine year old dog. Michele Halligan-Foley, M. Ed has been in the educational field for 28 years. Born and raised in Toronto Ontario, Michele received her Bachelor of Education Degree from Brock University in St. Catherine’s, Ontario. Michele went on to earn her Masters of Education Degree from the University of New England, and Principal Certification from Plymouth State University. She began her career in Toronto in 1987 and moved to New Hampshire in 1993. She worked in the Barrington School District for twenty-one years. During her time there, Michele was a Special Education Teacher, Reading Recover Teacher, Assistant Director of Student Services and Principal of the Early Childhood Learning Center. She created a number of state approved programs which included an integrated Preschool Program, a Life Skill Program (K-8), a Behavior Program (Grades 5-8), an Early Childhood Learning Center and full-day Kindergarten Program. Michele began a district-wide Mentor Program, and played an active role in the Jump Start to Literacy Program funded by the Barrington School Foundation. She received the Educational Excellence Award in 2005-2006 and has been honored for her work with Program Approval and Grant Writing. In July 2015, Michele began her new position in the Rochester School District as the “Communities for Children: Safe School/Healthy Students Grant Director.” Her position focuses on improving schools, building communities and changing lives. The goal of the grant is to create integrated systems that promote the mental health of students, enhance academic achievement, prevent violence and substance abuse and create safe and respectful school climates. Michele’s collaboration with state and local stakeholders is fundamental when building an “Interconnected System Framework.” Michele currently resides in Strafford, New Hampshire with her husband Sean. Her daughter Caitlin attends Clarkson University in New York.

Start Date

10-23-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

10-23-2016 11:00 AM

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Oct 23rd, 10:00 AM Oct 23rd, 11:00 AM

Supporting Children of Substance Abusing Parents

According to No Safe Have: Children of Substance Abusing Parents, children whose parents abuse alcohol and other drugs are almost 3 times likelier to be physically or sexually assaulted and more than 4 times likelier to be neglected by their parents compared to children of parents who are not substance abusers. In the midst of our current crisis this is often an over looked population which does not receive the resources necessary to thrive. Come join us for a discussion highlighting what we do to better support these youth.