Proposal Title

An Experimental Design Exploring the Functional Relationship Between On-Task Behavior and Concrete Math Manipulatives

Location

Walsh B

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

Historically, students have been required to suppress natural tendencies to be engaged as playful and active learners. Further, when students demonstrate problem behavior such as difficulty staying on-task, a common response is to remove learning tools, such as concrete manipulatives. Therefore, the purpose of this quantitative study was to explore whether a functional relationship exists between the dependent variable of on-task behavior and the independent variable of concrete math manipulatives during math instruction. Theoretical underpinnings were derived from constructivist theories and pedagogical practices that promote student engagement through active learning strategies. This study utilized single-participant methodology with an ABAB withdrawal design in a third-grade general education classroom. Results were analyzed using visual analyses. The findings provide strong evidence of a functional relationship between using concrete math manipulatives and on-task behavior. This study offers a valuable contribution to the literature because few, if any, previous studies exist that explicitly explore the effects of the active learning instructional strategy of using concrete math manipulatives on on-task behavior. Implications suggest that educators should maximize student engagement by incorporating concrete manipulatives within instructional activities instead of diminishing access to active learning opportunities in order to improve behavioral outcomes.

Keywords

On-Task Behavior, Concrete Math Manipulatives, Active Learning, Student Engagement, Constructivism

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Oct 7th, 10:30 AM Oct 7th, 12:00 PM

An Experimental Design Exploring the Functional Relationship Between On-Task Behavior and Concrete Math Manipulatives

Walsh B

Historically, students have been required to suppress natural tendencies to be engaged as playful and active learners. Further, when students demonstrate problem behavior such as difficulty staying on-task, a common response is to remove learning tools, such as concrete manipulatives. Therefore, the purpose of this quantitative study was to explore whether a functional relationship exists between the dependent variable of on-task behavior and the independent variable of concrete math manipulatives during math instruction. Theoretical underpinnings were derived from constructivist theories and pedagogical practices that promote student engagement through active learning strategies. This study utilized single-participant methodology with an ABAB withdrawal design in a third-grade general education classroom. Results were analyzed using visual analyses. The findings provide strong evidence of a functional relationship between using concrete math manipulatives and on-task behavior. This study offers a valuable contribution to the literature because few, if any, previous studies exist that explicitly explore the effects of the active learning instructional strategy of using concrete math manipulatives on on-task behavior. Implications suggest that educators should maximize student engagement by incorporating concrete manipulatives within instructional activities instead of diminishing access to active learning opportunities in order to improve behavioral outcomes.