Proposal Title

An Empircal Study of the Functional Relationship between a Responsive Classroom Management Program and Student Outcomes

Location

Moody

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

Historically, traditional classroom management practices include strategies that are reactive in nature. Maag (2001) asserted that educators rely exclusively on punitive techniques to manage their classroom despite research that discounts the deleterious effects of punishment. Consequently, educators’ overuse of and overreliance on non-evidence based practices create a cultural ethos in which the social, emotional, and academic development of students remains compromised. The purpose of this quantitative single-subject A-B-C-D-E-A design was to investigate the Behavioral Opportunities for Social Skills (B.O.S.S.) program, an evidence-based management approach, to promote proactive and responsive practices reflective of congruent communication between teachers and students (Ross, 2012). This study included one second grade teacher participant who implemented the B.O.S.S. program in scripted steps to determine whether a functional relationship existed between B.O.S.S. and student outcomes, specifically, positive peer interactions and on-task behavior. Four students served as participants. Results obtained through visual analyses of graphic data indicated that a functional relationship existed between the implementation of B.O.S.S., the frequency of positive peer relationships, and the maintenance of on-task behavior. Future research implications suggest the importance of the link between teachers’ responses to behavior and their implementation of evidence-based practices that promote the development of prosocial skills in students.

Keywords

classroom/behavior management, prosocial skills, communication, responsive practices

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Oct 7th, 10:30 AM Oct 7th, 12:00 PM

An Empircal Study of the Functional Relationship between a Responsive Classroom Management Program and Student Outcomes

Moody

Historically, traditional classroom management practices include strategies that are reactive in nature. Maag (2001) asserted that educators rely exclusively on punitive techniques to manage their classroom despite research that discounts the deleterious effects of punishment. Consequently, educators’ overuse of and overreliance on non-evidence based practices create a cultural ethos in which the social, emotional, and academic development of students remains compromised. The purpose of this quantitative single-subject A-B-C-D-E-A design was to investigate the Behavioral Opportunities for Social Skills (B.O.S.S.) program, an evidence-based management approach, to promote proactive and responsive practices reflective of congruent communication between teachers and students (Ross, 2012). This study included one second grade teacher participant who implemented the B.O.S.S. program in scripted steps to determine whether a functional relationship existed between B.O.S.S. and student outcomes, specifically, positive peer interactions and on-task behavior. Four students served as participants. Results obtained through visual analyses of graphic data indicated that a functional relationship existed between the implementation of B.O.S.S., the frequency of positive peer relationships, and the maintenance of on-task behavior. Future research implications suggest the importance of the link between teachers’ responses to behavior and their implementation of evidence-based practices that promote the development of prosocial skills in students.