Proposal Title

A Case Study Analysis of Parents’ Perceptions of Epstein’s Six Typologies of Parental Involvement in a K-12 Diverse School District

Location

Room 212

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Preferred Time

Saturday morning

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this mixed-methods case study using a survey method with closed- and open-ended response items was to examine parents' perceptions of parental involvement practices based on Epstein's (1993) Framework of Six Types of Involvement. This study examined a district-wide parent involvement program to determine its conformance to research findings on effective family engagement strategies and practices, and to assess changes in parent involvement in schools. The participants of this study were parents whose children were in kindergarten through twelfth grade school. The evidence from the closed-ended responses supported that Epstein’s Framework of Six Types of Involvement practices were key factors to parental involvement. Furthermore, the open-ended responses regarding parents’ perceptions of parental involvement provided evidence of effective program practices. The results from this study can possibly inform parental involvement coordinators, district and school leaders in similar districts on whether parents perceived Epstein’s Framework of Six Types of Involvement as an effective tool for parental engagement.

Keywords

parent involvement, parent engagement, home-school partnership

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Oct 17th, 9:00 AM Oct 17th, 10:15 AM

A Case Study Analysis of Parents’ Perceptions of Epstein’s Six Typologies of Parental Involvement in a K-12 Diverse School District

Room 212

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this mixed-methods case study using a survey method with closed- and open-ended response items was to examine parents' perceptions of parental involvement practices based on Epstein's (1993) Framework of Six Types of Involvement. This study examined a district-wide parent involvement program to determine its conformance to research findings on effective family engagement strategies and practices, and to assess changes in parent involvement in schools. The participants of this study were parents whose children were in kindergarten through twelfth grade school. The evidence from the closed-ended responses supported that Epstein’s Framework of Six Types of Involvement practices were key factors to parental involvement. Furthermore, the open-ended responses regarding parents’ perceptions of parental involvement provided evidence of effective program practices. The results from this study can possibly inform parental involvement coordinators, district and school leaders in similar districts on whether parents perceived Epstein’s Framework of Six Types of Involvement as an effective tool for parental engagement.