Proposal Title

A Case Study: Non-Hispanic Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of the Latino Education Culture

Location

Room 210

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Preferred Time

Saturday morning

Abstract

The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of non-Hispanic elementary teachers regarding Latino Education Culture and its role on academic experiences. As the number of Hispanic students continues to rise in the classroom, academic experiences are reportedly less equitable for this same demographic. The disproportionate gaps have caused Latinos to concede cultural identity in order to make minimal gains. A case study was employed to examine teachers' engagement, instructional practices, and cultural awareness preparation through the Latino academic context. Comprehensive discussions generated through interviews and journals addressed non-Hispanic teachers' views on Latino Education Culture, as well as peered at the cultural professional preparation of these teachers. An extensive observation of multiple content areas was utilized to understand instructional implementation. The data was analyzed through qualitative content analysis to discover latent and manifest meanings. The findings of the case study revealed that teachers' cultural perceptions in relation to school experiences were influenced by various theories of cognitive development. In addition, the findings indicated that episodic occurrences of unintentional prejudice might be at work in predominately Latino classrooms. The research findings provide insight into the development of culturally responsive pedagogy and the engaging of the Hispanic community.

Keywords

Latino, Elementary, Culture, Perceptions, Instruction

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Oct 17th, 10:30 AM Oct 17th, 11:45 AM

A Case Study: Non-Hispanic Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of the Latino Education Culture

Room 210

The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of non-Hispanic elementary teachers regarding Latino Education Culture and its role on academic experiences. As the number of Hispanic students continues to rise in the classroom, academic experiences are reportedly less equitable for this same demographic. The disproportionate gaps have caused Latinos to concede cultural identity in order to make minimal gains. A case study was employed to examine teachers' engagement, instructional practices, and cultural awareness preparation through the Latino academic context. Comprehensive discussions generated through interviews and journals addressed non-Hispanic teachers' views on Latino Education Culture, as well as peered at the cultural professional preparation of these teachers. An extensive observation of multiple content areas was utilized to understand instructional implementation. The data was analyzed through qualitative content analysis to discover latent and manifest meanings. The findings of the case study revealed that teachers' cultural perceptions in relation to school experiences were influenced by various theories of cognitive development. In addition, the findings indicated that episodic occurrences of unintentional prejudice might be at work in predominately Latino classrooms. The research findings provide insight into the development of culturally responsive pedagogy and the engaging of the Hispanic community.