Presentation Title

Almost everything you've ever wanted to know about video-based instruction

Brief Biography

Christopher Tullis is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral (BCBA-D) and an assistant professor of special education in the Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders. His research interests include teaching people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) problem solving skills, behavioral assessment of people with ASD, and teaching daily living and vocational skills using video-prompting and video modeling.

Dr. Tullis received his bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Georgia, his master’s degree in educational psychology from Georgia State University and his doctorate in special education and applied behavior analysis from The Ohio State University. He was formerly an assistant professor of applied behavior analysis at Ball State University and has published in the Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, Psychology in the Schools, Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, and Education and Treatment in Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

Highest Degree of Presenter(s)

Christopher A. Tullis PhD BCBA-D

Eliseo D. Jimenez PhD BCBA-D

Presentation Abstract

Video-based instruction is an evidence-based educational method that has been demonstrated to be effective in teaching a number of academic, vocational, and social skills. This type of instruction is also advantageous for a number of reasons. First, it may foster independence a greater degree of independence. Second, video-based instruction can be highly portable given advances in mobile technology. Last, video-based instruction may be more socially appropriate in community settings because of the ubiquitous nature of mobile devices. Although effective, some professionals may struggle with the typical set up of a program using video-prompting or modeling. This presentation will guide attendees through the research-base, current data, and set-up video-based instruction for a number of community-based skills.

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Almost everything you've ever wanted to know about video-based instruction

Atlanta

Video-based instruction is an evidence-based educational method that has been demonstrated to be effective in teaching a number of academic, vocational, and social skills. This type of instruction is also advantageous for a number of reasons. First, it may foster independence a greater degree of independence. Second, video-based instruction can be highly portable given advances in mobile technology. Last, video-based instruction may be more socially appropriate in community settings because of the ubiquitous nature of mobile devices. Although effective, some professionals may struggle with the typical set up of a program using video-prompting or modeling. This presentation will guide attendees through the research-base, current data, and set-up video-based instruction for a number of community-based skills.