Presentation Title

Restorative Discipline: Rebuilding Learning Communities Through Responsive Practices

Brief Biography

Alisa L. Long

Douglas County School District

4841 Bill Arp Road / Highway 5; Douglasville, Georgia 30134

alisa.long@douglas.k12.ga.us

Alisa Long serves as the Supervisor of Behavioral Services for her district. Previously, she was as an Education Evaluator and assisted with eligibility determinations through assessment. Additional roles include those of lead teacher at the high school level and elementary/middle school teacher for special populations. Mrs. Long holds a Specialist’s Degree in Educational Leadership and a Master’s Degree in Behavior Disorders from the State University of West Georgia. She obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from Berry College. Certifications include those of special educator and support specialist. She is currently a doctoral candidate at Mercer studying Curriculum and Instruction. Current research interests are in effective classroom management and the school-to-prison pipeline.

Teresa L. Abbey

Douglas County School District

4841 Bill Arp Road / Highway 5; Douglasville, Georgia 30134

teresa.abbey@douglas.k12.ga.us

Teresa Abbey is currently a Behavioral Specialist in her district. Her experience includes six years as an elementary school Assistant Principal, two years as a Lead Teacher, and eight years teaching students in grades ranging from kindergarten through eighth grade. Teresa is certified in Educational Leadership, Early Childhood, Reading Specialist, ESOL, Behavior Disorders, and Teacher Support Specialist. Teresa obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology at Central Michigan University, Master’s Degree in Special Education at North Georgia College and State University, and Specialist’s Degree in Educational Leadership from the State University of West Georgia. She is currently a doctoral candidate at Mercer studying Curriculum and Instruction. Her research interests include student engagement through active learning strategies.

Anaya L. Bryson, Ed.S.

437 Old Peachtree Road NW, Suwanee, Georgia 30024

Anaya_Bryson@gwinnett.k12.ga.us.

Anaya Bryson has been an elementary education teacher with Gwinnett County Public Schools for 10 years—teaching numerous grade levels and providing instructional support for English Language Learners, Students with Disabilities, and Students within gifted education programs. Mrs. Bryson has served as an instructional lead teacher and has conducted numerous professional development workshops for teachers regarding the RTI process, differentiated instruction for gifted students, and best practices in mathematics. Anaya obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from the University of Georgia, Master’s Degree in Early Childhood Education from Mercer University, and Specialist Degree in Teacher Leadership from Mercer University. At present, Mrs. Bryson is a Curriculum and Instruction Ph.D. candidate, researching the role of critically reflective praxis on the development of novice, elementary mathematics teachers’ self efficacy.

Highest Degree of Presenter(s)

Alisa L. Long: Ed.S. Educational Leadership, 2010

Teresa L. Abbey: Ed.S. Educational Leadership, 2010

Anaya Bryson: Ed.S. Teacher Leadership, 2010

Presentation Abstract

For access to presentation materials, use the password (use all caps): GAPBS

Restorative Discipline: Rebuilding Learning Communities Through Responsive Practices

In discussions of student discipline, some argue that marginalized groups receive harsher punishments than their peers. National and state data reported by the U.S. Department of Education document that disparities result in consequences that perpetuate the school-to-prison pipeline. While some argue in favor of traditionally punitive reactions to student misbehavior, others contend that punitive consequences are ineffective. Because punishment does not teach replacement skills, its use serves only as a temporary fix. Further, harsh consequences enacted as a result of no tolerance policies do not make schools safer and often violate student rights, specifically for those who comprise special populations and/or communities of color.

One way to empower students and protect student rights is to approach problem behavior through restorative discipline. Restorative discipline supports evidence-based practices by including features of how to: 1. Maximize structure, 2. Post, teach, review, monitor, and reinforce expectations, 3. Actively engage students in observable ways, 4. Use a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior, and 5. Use a continuum of strategies to acknowledge inappropriate behavior. Restorative practices include lessons that focus on acquisition of prosocial skills, preparing students for navigation of difficult situations. Additionally, key tenets of restorative discipline emphasize the importance of educators using preventative strategies rather than resorting to reactive measures.

Protecting student dignity and student rights extends far beyond selecting a classroom management program for teaching students replacement behaviors. It also requires educators and parents to shift paradigms from a culture of punitive consequences to one that embodies proactive responses to address challenging behaviors, while holding students accountable for their choices and actions. Together, parents, guardians, and educators can embrace restorative practices to rebuild learning communities that ensure equity and accessibility to a social curriculum that is taught with intentionality and with purpose.

 

Restorative Discipline: Rebuilding Learning Communities Through Responsive Practices

For access to presentation materials, use the password (use all caps): GAPBS

Restorative Discipline: Rebuilding Learning Communities Through Responsive Practices

In discussions of student discipline, some argue that marginalized groups receive harsher punishments than their peers. National and state data reported by the U.S. Department of Education document that disparities result in consequences that perpetuate the school-to-prison pipeline. While some argue in favor of traditionally punitive reactions to student misbehavior, others contend that punitive consequences are ineffective. Because punishment does not teach replacement skills, its use serves only as a temporary fix. Further, harsh consequences enacted as a result of no tolerance policies do not make schools safer and often violate student rights, specifically for those who comprise special populations and/or communities of color.

One way to empower students and protect student rights is to approach problem behavior through restorative discipline. Restorative discipline supports evidence-based practices by including features of how to: 1. Maximize structure, 2. Post, teach, review, monitor, and reinforce expectations, 3. Actively engage students in observable ways, 4. Use a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior, and 5. Use a continuum of strategies to acknowledge inappropriate behavior. Restorative practices include lessons that focus on acquisition of prosocial skills, preparing students for navigation of difficult situations. Additionally, key tenets of restorative discipline emphasize the importance of educators using preventative strategies rather than resorting to reactive measures.

Protecting student dignity and student rights extends far beyond selecting a classroom management program for teaching students replacement behaviors. It also requires educators and parents to shift paradigms from a culture of punitive consequences to one that embodies proactive responses to address challenging behaviors, while holding students accountable for their choices and actions. Together, parents, guardians, and educators can embrace restorative practices to rebuild learning communities that ensure equity and accessibility to a social curriculum that is taught with intentionality and with purpose.