Presentation Title

Dialogue Journaling and Students in a Therapeutic Education Setting

Brief Biography

Carrie Kane is a 4th-year doctoral student working on a degree in special education. Her research is focused on students with learning and behavior disabilities in alternative school settings.

Highest Degree of Presenter(s)

Carrie Kane MEd

David Houchins PhD

Kristen Varjas PhD

James Schwab MEd

Presentation Abstract

Disruptive behavior and academic achievement are concerns for all teachers, but are especially concerning for teacher in alternative settings (Lehr, Tan, & Ysseldyke, 2009). Positive school climate, including positive student-teacher relationships, is one way to address both academic achievement, and student behavior outcomes (Cohen, McCabe, Michelli, & Pickeral, 2009). In addition, implementing effective instructional strategies has been shown to improve on-task behavior as well as academic achievement (Gunter, Hummel, & Conroy, 1998). One instructional strategy that has been shown to improve student on-task behavior and writing skills is Dialogue Journaling (Regan, Mastropieri, & Scruggs, 2005). This study looked at using dialogue journaling between students and their teacher and its impact on student’s on-task behavior, writing skills, sense of school belonging and student teacher relationships. This study used a single case multiple baseline design across participants. The participants were six, ninth grade student in two therapeutic school classrooms. Baseline data was be collected. Then students began making dialogue journal entries daily during the first 15 minutes of class and the teacher wrote daily responses. The researcher collected interval recording momentary time sampling data on on-task behavior three times per week. The researcher evaluated the journal entries and the total number of words written and correct word sequence data will be collected. Also pre and post intervention, teachers and students completed Gehlbach’s Teacher-student relationship scale, and students completed the Psychological Sense of School Membership Survey. Using positive interventions like dialogue journaling to improve student teacher relationships and in turn improving student behavior is a benefit to the students, teachers, community, and parents. The research shows that if a student has one ally in a building they are more likely to have a successful educational experience.

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Dialogue Journaling and Students in a Therapeutic Education Setting

Disruptive behavior and academic achievement are concerns for all teachers, but are especially concerning for teacher in alternative settings (Lehr, Tan, & Ysseldyke, 2009). Positive school climate, including positive student-teacher relationships, is one way to address both academic achievement, and student behavior outcomes (Cohen, McCabe, Michelli, & Pickeral, 2009). In addition, implementing effective instructional strategies has been shown to improve on-task behavior as well as academic achievement (Gunter, Hummel, & Conroy, 1998). One instructional strategy that has been shown to improve student on-task behavior and writing skills is Dialogue Journaling (Regan, Mastropieri, & Scruggs, 2005). This study looked at using dialogue journaling between students and their teacher and its impact on student’s on-task behavior, writing skills, sense of school belonging and student teacher relationships. This study used a single case multiple baseline design across participants. The participants were six, ninth grade student in two therapeutic school classrooms. Baseline data was be collected. Then students began making dialogue journal entries daily during the first 15 minutes of class and the teacher wrote daily responses. The researcher collected interval recording momentary time sampling data on on-task behavior three times per week. The researcher evaluated the journal entries and the total number of words written and correct word sequence data will be collected. Also pre and post intervention, teachers and students completed Gehlbach’s Teacher-student relationship scale, and students completed the Psychological Sense of School Membership Survey. Using positive interventions like dialogue journaling to improve student teacher relationships and in turn improving student behavior is a benefit to the students, teachers, community, and parents. The research shows that if a student has one ally in a building they are more likely to have a successful educational experience.