Presentation Title

Creating Self-Sufficient Learners: Applying the Science of Self-Control and Delayed Gratification to Academic Management

Brief Biography

Sucheta Kamath helps people change the way they think and learn. As an Executive Function specialist, Sucheta is highly specialized in retraining those brains that are very smart but are underachieving because of internal disorganization of thoughts, ideas and implementation. Founder of www.cerebralmatters.com, Sucheta is a trained Speech Language Pathologist and a Linguist with specialized training in Neurogenic Communication disorders. As an expert in treating Executive Function Disorder, Sucheta is a sought out professional speaker, consultant and an educator. She is a recipient of the ‘Stephanie Macaluso Expertise in Clinical Practice Award’ and the ‘Partners in Excellence Award’ for leadership and innovation. Sucheta is a graduate of Leadership Atlanta Class of 2015. Sucheta treats various brain-based communication disorders including aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, spasmodic dysphonia and written language disorders. She also treats individuals with ADHD, LD, Dyslexia, Asperger’s syndrome and those with concussions, TBIs, strokes and other neurological disorders. Sucheta works to implement her Think-To-Learn programs to emphasize Executive Function learning in academic, educational and corporate settings. These approaches and techniques are unique, useful and essential for all individuals; not just those who have learning or thinking deficits.

Highest Degree of Presenter(s)

Masters in Speech- Language Pathology

Masters in Linguistics

Board Certification in Neurogenic Communication Disorders

Presentation Abstract

Learning requires the management of two key ideas: content and intent. Students with strong Executive Function skills can intuitively understand the teacher’s intent and task directionality when managing novel content. As a result, they are better at predicting why and how this new learning will impact their performance in the future. However, students with a variety of learning disabilities are unable to manage goals, identify and isolate low relevance details from the main ideas, and develop self-management tools.

Though educators often employ the technique of delayed gratification, which requires an individual to suppress the urge for immediate rewards in favor of long-term benefits, students with learning disabilities cannot stay focused or motivated when the content does not seem to provide an instantaneous advantage. Thus, in order to improve their academic management, students need to be explicitly taught and given opportunities to develop their Executive Functions. This powerful method will allow them hone their academic abilities, showing them how to better learn, study, organize, prioritize, review, and actively participate in class.

Based on current neuroscience research, this presentation will address the development of the prefrontal cortex, which acts as the framework to understand the relationship between Executive Functions and self-regulation. Sucheta will also cover learning techniques for students to organize, plan ahead, and keep records of their most successful study strategies. Finally, she will discuss specific methods where students can employ the process of delayed gratification in order to cultivate a joy of learning.

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Creating Self-Sufficient Learners: Applying the Science of Self-Control and Delayed Gratification to Academic Management

Learning requires the management of two key ideas: content and intent. Students with strong Executive Function skills can intuitively understand the teacher’s intent and task directionality when managing novel content. As a result, they are better at predicting why and how this new learning will impact their performance in the future. However, students with a variety of learning disabilities are unable to manage goals, identify and isolate low relevance details from the main ideas, and develop self-management tools.

Though educators often employ the technique of delayed gratification, which requires an individual to suppress the urge for immediate rewards in favor of long-term benefits, students with learning disabilities cannot stay focused or motivated when the content does not seem to provide an instantaneous advantage. Thus, in order to improve their academic management, students need to be explicitly taught and given opportunities to develop their Executive Functions. This powerful method will allow them hone their academic abilities, showing them how to better learn, study, organize, prioritize, review, and actively participate in class.

Based on current neuroscience research, this presentation will address the development of the prefrontal cortex, which acts as the framework to understand the relationship between Executive Functions and self-regulation. Sucheta will also cover learning techniques for students to organize, plan ahead, and keep records of their most successful study strategies. Finally, she will discuss specific methods where students can employ the process of delayed gratification in order to cultivate a joy of learning.