Presentation Title

Dad2K: A Skills Based Fathering Program for At-Risk Families

Brief Biography

Elizabeth Meister is an NSTRC Trainer in the National SafeCare Training and Research Center (NSTRC), which is housed in the Center for Healthy Development in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University (GSU), where she conducts trainings and provides on-going consultation and support to sites implementing SafeCare, and contributes to the revision of SafeCare curriculum and training protocols.

Prior to joining the staff at GSU, Elizabeth completed her graduate internship at Savannah College of Art and Design – Atlanta Counseling and Student Support Services, where she worked with students in individual, crisis, group, and couples counseling along with various psychoeducational workshops and student outreach. As a council member of the Georgia College Counseling Association, Elizabeth was awarded the President’s Grant from GCCA in January 2011. She has completed additional training in play and expressive therapies and traumatology.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Clinton Boyd, Jr. is currently a Ph.D. sociology student at Georgia State University where he specializes in race and urban studies. Self-proclaimed as an “Applied Sociologist”, Mr. Boyd, Jr. is firmly committed to bridging the gap between research and practice. Clinton’s research centers on disadvantaged fatherhood, workforce development, urban inequality, child well-being, and social policy.

Furthermore, in an effort to broaden his interdisciplinary reach, Clinton also serves as a research fellow with the National SafeCare Training and Research Center, which is a branch of Georgia State University’s School of Public Health. During his tenure as a research fellow, Clinton has been responsible for assisting DAD2K Principal Investigator (Dr. Shannon Self-Brown) with data collection and report writing, and also for providing home visiting services to high-risk male parents.

Highest Degree of Presenter(s)

Elizabeth Meister, MS

Clinton Boyd, Jr., MA

Presentation Abstract

This presentation will discuss the Dad2K (Dads to Kids) program, a technology enhanced parenting program for fathers of children from walking to age 5. Positive father involvement in a child's life is associated with positive childhood outcomes throughout development. Thirty-six percent of child maltreatment cases involve fathers, and fathers who are younger, of minority ethnicity, or who suffered maltreatment as children are at higher risk for maltreatment. Dad2K targets those most at risk to train them in parent-child interaction skills to reduce maltreatment and enhance positive relationships and behavior of Father and Child.

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Dec 4th, 12:15 PM Dec 4th, 1:15 PM

Dad2K: A Skills Based Fathering Program for At-Risk Families

Student Center-Lanier

This presentation will discuss the Dad2K (Dads to Kids) program, a technology enhanced parenting program for fathers of children from walking to age 5. Positive father involvement in a child's life is associated with positive childhood outcomes throughout development. Thirty-six percent of child maltreatment cases involve fathers, and fathers who are younger, of minority ethnicity, or who suffered maltreatment as children are at higher risk for maltreatment. Dad2K targets those most at risk to train them in parent-child interaction skills to reduce maltreatment and enhance positive relationships and behavior of Father and Child.