Presentation Title

Developing media literacy skills using a threshold concept: A case study for a large enrollment course

Location

Room 1002

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

This session describes the use of “Authority is constructed and contextual,” a threshold concept from ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework), as a way to help develop media literacy skills in an entry-level Humanities course (n=77) in the fall 2015 semester.

The threshold concept was used to begin collaborating on student learning outcomes, as a guide to develop a lesson plan for a large-enrollment course, and as a way to assess student understanding. According to a pre-survey assessment, students in the course did not show evidence of thinking deeply about who created information, nor where it came from. This data provided a starting point for developing a flipped instruction session that involved investigating and evaluating advertisements on social media, an approach that engaged students without being didactic. An informal classroom assessment, the one-minute paper, was then used to gauge students’ ability in evaluating an information source.

Attendees will leave the session with talking points for collaborating with faculty using the Framework, and ideas for lesson plans regardless of class size.

Presentation Description

This session describes the use of ACRL’s Framework as a way to develop media literacy skills in an entry-level Humanities course. A Framework concept was used to begin collaborating on shared student learning outcomes, as a guide to develop a lesson plan, and as a way to assess student understanding.

Keywords

Media literacy skills, ACRL Framework, flipped classroom, large enrollment

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 1st, 9:45 AM Oct 1st, 11:00 AM

Developing media literacy skills using a threshold concept: A case study for a large enrollment course

Room 1002

This session describes the use of “Authority is constructed and contextual,” a threshold concept from ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework), as a way to help develop media literacy skills in an entry-level Humanities course (n=77) in the fall 2015 semester.

The threshold concept was used to begin collaborating on student learning outcomes, as a guide to develop a lesson plan for a large-enrollment course, and as a way to assess student understanding. According to a pre-survey assessment, students in the course did not show evidence of thinking deeply about who created information, nor where it came from. This data provided a starting point for developing a flipped instruction session that involved investigating and evaluating advertisements on social media, an approach that engaged students without being didactic. An informal classroom assessment, the one-minute paper, was then used to gauge students’ ability in evaluating an information source.

Attendees will leave the session with talking points for collaborating with faculty using the Framework, and ideas for lesson plans regardless of class size.