Location

Room 212

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

English faculty at Florida State College at Jacksonville were facing increasing frustration in the fight against student plagiarism. The Letters Council began to explore ways to assess student learning outcomes across the college on the topic of plagiarism. It was imperative to reach not only face-to-face students, but also online, and hybrid classes.

In the fall of 2015 the library subscribed to the ProQuest Research Companion database which is a one-stop resource for guiding students through the research process. Through short videos organized into nine learning modules covering finding information, evaluating information, and using information, students complete pre and post assessments to evaluate their information literacy skills.

Several faculty members were invited to preview the ProQuest Research Companion database and asked to field test it in their classes. When the English faculty began to discuss possible assessments for improving students’ use of sources, those faculty familiar with ProQuest Research invited the librarians to present the product to the Letters Council, the body responsible for writing outcomes and choosing assessment methods for writing faculty.

After a presentation by the Executive Dean of the Library Learning Commons to the Letters Council faculty, the decision was made to collaborate to produce an assessment of students’ research skills and responsible uses of sources using Module 8: How Do I Avoid Plagiarism and Find My Own Voice?.

This presentation will cover the discussion and collaboration between faculty and librarians regarding the Research Companion assessment and the need to develop an in-house assessment product better suited to faculty needs.

Presentation Description

This presentation will cover the discussion and collaboration between faculty and librarians regarding the use of the database Research Companion to improve students’ information literacy skills. Presenters will describe the process used to develop an in-house assessment product to accompany the database and assess learning outcomes.

Keywords

Collaboration, Partnerships, Learning outcomes, Assessment, Plagiarism, Information literacy

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 30th, 1:15 PM Sep 30th, 2:30 PM

Meeting Outcomes Assessment: An Opportunity for Partnership

Room 212

English faculty at Florida State College at Jacksonville were facing increasing frustration in the fight against student plagiarism. The Letters Council began to explore ways to assess student learning outcomes across the college on the topic of plagiarism. It was imperative to reach not only face-to-face students, but also online, and hybrid classes.

In the fall of 2015 the library subscribed to the ProQuest Research Companion database which is a one-stop resource for guiding students through the research process. Through short videos organized into nine learning modules covering finding information, evaluating information, and using information, students complete pre and post assessments to evaluate their information literacy skills.

Several faculty members were invited to preview the ProQuest Research Companion database and asked to field test it in their classes. When the English faculty began to discuss possible assessments for improving students’ use of sources, those faculty familiar with ProQuest Research invited the librarians to present the product to the Letters Council, the body responsible for writing outcomes and choosing assessment methods for writing faculty.

After a presentation by the Executive Dean of the Library Learning Commons to the Letters Council faculty, the decision was made to collaborate to produce an assessment of students’ research skills and responsible uses of sources using Module 8: How Do I Avoid Plagiarism and Find My Own Voice?.

This presentation will cover the discussion and collaboration between faculty and librarians regarding the Research Companion assessment and the need to develop an in-house assessment product better suited to faculty needs.