Presentation Title

College Ready With 21st Century Research Skills

Location

Room 210

Type of Presentation

Workshop (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Target Audience

K-12

Abstract

Today, college students are majoring in fields that didn’t exist 10 years ago. This is an indication that there are new fields for which young adults must be prepared. They should at least have some knowledge of software, hardware, and searching and evaluation techniques that may be needed in many programs and occupations. Despite an assumed ability on the part of most young adults, the Media Awareness Network found that in attempting to complete homework many young people found that completing their homework was easier when they relied on a few books, rather than the Internet . While books are still valuable and effective resources, given that 94% of young adults use the Internet by the time they leave high school.

As librarians, educators, parents, neighbors, and consumers of information, we have every reason to want students familiar with proper citation, basic research skills, the potential and limitations of the Internet, and concepts such as intellectual property. Librarians can theoretically provide instruction on a variety of aspects of information literacy Giving students these skills and competencies not only prepares them for the workplace, but certifies our society as one that cares about producing and consuming accurate, authoritative information. Young people will certainly be using electronic and digital services as a part of their research techniques, and will need to be taught to properly use these resources.

This interactive workshop will provide hands on techniques for teaching 21st century information literacy skills to middle & high school students

Presentation Description

Today, college students are majoring in fields that didn’t exist 10 years ago. This is an indication that there are new fields for which young adults must be prepared. They should at least have some knowledge of software, hardware, and searching and evaluation techniques that may be needed in many programs and occupations. Despite an assumed ability on the part of most young adults, the Media Awareness Network found that in attempting to complete homework many young people found that completing their homework was easier when they relied on a few books, rather than the Internet . While books are still valuable and effective resources, given that 94% of young adults use the Internet by the time they leave high school. As librarians, educators, parents, neighbors, and consumers of information, we have every reason to want students familiar with proper citation, basic research skills, the potential and limitations of the Internet, and concepts such as intellectual property. Librarians can theoretically provide instruction on a variety of aspects of information literacy Giving students these skills and competencies not only prepares them for the workplace, but certifies our society as one that cares about producing and consuming accurate, authoritative information. Young people will certainly be using electronic and digital services as a part of their research techniques, and will need to be taught to properly use these resources. The objective of this workshop is to provide teachers, librarians, a variety of useful techniques and solutions so that students k-12can gain effective research skills. The workshop will consist of a hands on interactive powerpoint presentation Topics include: Super 3 model grades 3-6, will present a variety of tools used in obtaining effective research skills Super six model grades 7-12 will discuss a variety of tools used in obtaining effective research skills Virtual library for k-6 7-12 grade Jstor for teens Note taking and Citing Sources Evaluating Research Skills Information literacy assessments pretest and posttests for 11 & 12th grade Website evaluation tools Class tools- game generator

Keywords

Information literacy, research skills

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Sep 30th, 10:00 AM Sep 30th, 11:30 AM

College Ready With 21st Century Research Skills

Room 210

Today, college students are majoring in fields that didn’t exist 10 years ago. This is an indication that there are new fields for which young adults must be prepared. They should at least have some knowledge of software, hardware, and searching and evaluation techniques that may be needed in many programs and occupations. Despite an assumed ability on the part of most young adults, the Media Awareness Network found that in attempting to complete homework many young people found that completing their homework was easier when they relied on a few books, rather than the Internet . While books are still valuable and effective resources, given that 94% of young adults use the Internet by the time they leave high school.

As librarians, educators, parents, neighbors, and consumers of information, we have every reason to want students familiar with proper citation, basic research skills, the potential and limitations of the Internet, and concepts such as intellectual property. Librarians can theoretically provide instruction on a variety of aspects of information literacy Giving students these skills and competencies not only prepares them for the workplace, but certifies our society as one that cares about producing and consuming accurate, authoritative information. Young people will certainly be using electronic and digital services as a part of their research techniques, and will need to be taught to properly use these resources.

This interactive workshop will provide hands on techniques for teaching 21st century information literacy skills to middle & high school students