Presentation Title

Beyond "Because I Said So": Answering the Question of 'Why Do We Need Information Literacy Training?' through Data and Evidence

Location

Room 1002

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Information literacy programs are often criticized for their essentialist or prescriptive leanings in that users are taught to “do” rather than “think about” information. The “so what?” factor typically remains an underlying substrate. This presentation is intended to challenge information literacy instructors, particularly at the academic library level, to situate their workshops in evidence. The speaker will highlight ways in which she uses various research findings on the ramifications of the lack of information literacy to make the case for the need to effectively find, synthesize and evaluate resources. The problem of high school and college students’ below-proficient skills has been substantiated by Pew Research Center findings along with several small-scale studies. This reality is often left unmentioned during information literacy training. By providing statistics as a means to draw awareness and foster engagement during workshops, instructors shift the orientation from “busy work” to competence-building. Discussion warmers can help place emphasis on the bigger picture of the non-academic, real-life implications of information illiteracy. This topic is timely in light of the recent debates around the newly-adopted ACRL Information Literacy Framework, which is intended to promote research as inquiry as opposed to performance. The desired outcome of this presentation is for participants to learn practical tips for infusing quick, data-driven ice breakers into information literacy workshops in order to improve clarity and quality.

Presentation Description

This presentation will demonstrate how instructors can use evidence-based discussion warmers to emphasized the bigger picture of the non-academic, real-life implications of information illiteracy. The desired outcome is for participants to learn practical tips for infusing quick, data-driven ice breakers into IL training in order to improve clarity and quality.

Keywords

Information literacy programs, Academic libraries, Student-centered learning, Evidence-based curriculum, Statistics, Data

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 30th, 8:30 AM Sep 30th, 9:45 AM

Beyond "Because I Said So": Answering the Question of 'Why Do We Need Information Literacy Training?' through Data and Evidence

Room 1002

Information literacy programs are often criticized for their essentialist or prescriptive leanings in that users are taught to “do” rather than “think about” information. The “so what?” factor typically remains an underlying substrate. This presentation is intended to challenge information literacy instructors, particularly at the academic library level, to situate their workshops in evidence. The speaker will highlight ways in which she uses various research findings on the ramifications of the lack of information literacy to make the case for the need to effectively find, synthesize and evaluate resources. The problem of high school and college students’ below-proficient skills has been substantiated by Pew Research Center findings along with several small-scale studies. This reality is often left unmentioned during information literacy training. By providing statistics as a means to draw awareness and foster engagement during workshops, instructors shift the orientation from “busy work” to competence-building. Discussion warmers can help place emphasis on the bigger picture of the non-academic, real-life implications of information illiteracy. This topic is timely in light of the recent debates around the newly-adopted ACRL Information Literacy Framework, which is intended to promote research as inquiry as opposed to performance. The desired outcome of this presentation is for participants to learn practical tips for infusing quick, data-driven ice breakers into information literacy workshops in order to improve clarity and quality.