Presentation Title

Examining the Effectiveness of Various Pedagogies on Active Student Participation in the EN102 Information Literacy Classroom

Type of Presentation

Poster Session (45 minutes)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

While many studies focus on student engagement by studying the students, few focus on the actions of teachers, and virtually no studies focus on the actions of the instruction librarian. In an attempt to measure the effect librarians have on active student engagement, we have devised a three-part study that spans three semesters to answer the research question “How do librarians facilitate active student engagement in library classes?”

Part one of the study entitled, “Librarian Facilitation of Active Participation in the EN102 Information Literacy Classroom,” focuses on the teaching techniques of each subject (librarian) correlated to the participation of students as defined by an action resulting from a librarian-query. The investigators started with the assumption that each subject will have a unique and varied teaching style. It is hoped that through this study, ubiquitous strong and weak pedagogies can be identified.

Data for this study was gathered through:

  • A preliminary survey asking subjects to self-report on the types of pedagogies and teaching aids they employ.

  • Classroom observations using a rubric to gather data such as:

    • basic demographic and environmental data (number of students, time of day, classroom location)

    • how many scripted and non-scripted questions the librarian asks (and what the student response was)

    • how the questions were asked (polling, discussion, worksheet),

    • what kinds of pedagogies the librarian employs (visual aids, discussion, lecture, interactive, group work).

This poster session will share the results of part one of this study, and give recommendations to help improve student participation in library instruction sessions.

Presentation Description

While many studies focus on student engagement by studying the students, few focus on the actions of teachers, and virtually no studies focus on the actions of the instruction librarian. In this poster session, the presenters will share the results of a study intended to measure the effect various pedagogies and teaching techniques had on students during information literacy instruction. Data for this study was gathered through a survey and classroom observation. Presenters will give recommendations to help improve student participation in library instruction based on the results.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 12:30 PM Sep 25th, 1:45 PM

Examining the Effectiveness of Various Pedagogies on Active Student Participation in the EN102 Information Literacy Classroom

While many studies focus on student engagement by studying the students, few focus on the actions of teachers, and virtually no studies focus on the actions of the instruction librarian. In an attempt to measure the effect librarians have on active student engagement, we have devised a three-part study that spans three semesters to answer the research question “How do librarians facilitate active student engagement in library classes?”

Part one of the study entitled, “Librarian Facilitation of Active Participation in the EN102 Information Literacy Classroom,” focuses on the teaching techniques of each subject (librarian) correlated to the participation of students as defined by an action resulting from a librarian-query. The investigators started with the assumption that each subject will have a unique and varied teaching style. It is hoped that through this study, ubiquitous strong and weak pedagogies can be identified.

Data for this study was gathered through:

  • A preliminary survey asking subjects to self-report on the types of pedagogies and teaching aids they employ.

  • Classroom observations using a rubric to gather data such as:

    • basic demographic and environmental data (number of students, time of day, classroom location)

    • how many scripted and non-scripted questions the librarian asks (and what the student response was)

    • how the questions were asked (polling, discussion, worksheet),

    • what kinds of pedagogies the librarian employs (visual aids, discussion, lecture, interactive, group work).

This poster session will share the results of part one of this study, and give recommendations to help improve student participation in library instruction sessions.