Presentation Title

The library at the intersection of undergraduate research and information literacy

Location

Room 212

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Student research, learning and engagement activities transcend campus boundaries and classroom walls. One of the “high impact educational practices” at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) is an annual Student Research and Creative Endeavor Symposium which fulfills aspects of the library and institutional missions and exemplifies AAC&U LEAP and other information literacy initiatives. High-impact practices include first-year seminars and experiences, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing-intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, diversity/global learning, service learning/community-based learning, internships, capstone courses and projects (Kuh, High-Impact Educational Practices 2008, 9-11).

The library at IPFW is an integral institutional academic partner in this important campus collaboration and event. Importantly for the library, the student symposium advances the ACRL Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education in several spheres: research, metaliteracy, scholarly communication and others. The Symposium provides unique assessment opportunities ranging from student self-assessment of their learning gains and application of knowledge and peer assessment by student audience members in addition to faculty judges’ assessment of the student presentation.

The inclusion of student work in the university’s open-access scholarly repository Opus, managed by the library, provides an opportunity to engage with student participants in an understanding of scholarly communication and open-access.

Equally importantly for the university, the symposium focuses on a time-honored academic research and presentation tradition and also provides “skills of the future” for graduate and undergraduate student participants: cognitive load management, novel and adaptive thinking, transdisciplinarity, and sensemaking.

Presentation Description

One of the “high impact educational practices” at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne is an annual Student Research and Creative Endeavor Symposium which fulfills aspects of the library and institutional missions and exemplifies AAC&U LEAP and other information literacy initiatives. The library is an integral institutional academic partner in this campus collaboration. For the library, the student symposium advances the ACRL Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education in several spheres: research, metaliteracy, scholarly communication and others. The inclusion of student work in the university’s open-access scholarly repository Opus, managed by the library, provides an opportunity to engage with student participants in an understanding of scholarly communication and open-access.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 26th, 9:45 AM Sep 26th, 11:00 AM

The library at the intersection of undergraduate research and information literacy

Room 212

Student research, learning and engagement activities transcend campus boundaries and classroom walls. One of the “high impact educational practices” at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) is an annual Student Research and Creative Endeavor Symposium which fulfills aspects of the library and institutional missions and exemplifies AAC&U LEAP and other information literacy initiatives. High-impact practices include first-year seminars and experiences, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing-intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, diversity/global learning, service learning/community-based learning, internships, capstone courses and projects (Kuh, High-Impact Educational Practices 2008, 9-11).

The library at IPFW is an integral institutional academic partner in this important campus collaboration and event. Importantly for the library, the student symposium advances the ACRL Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education in several spheres: research, metaliteracy, scholarly communication and others. The Symposium provides unique assessment opportunities ranging from student self-assessment of their learning gains and application of knowledge and peer assessment by student audience members in addition to faculty judges’ assessment of the student presentation.

The inclusion of student work in the university’s open-access scholarly repository Opus, managed by the library, provides an opportunity to engage with student participants in an understanding of scholarly communication and open-access.

Equally importantly for the university, the symposium focuses on a time-honored academic research and presentation tradition and also provides “skills of the future” for graduate and undergraduate student participants: cognitive load management, novel and adaptive thinking, transdisciplinarity, and sensemaking.