Presentation Title

Dilemmas in Teaching Information Search Tools: Discovery Systems, Subject Specific Databases or Google Scholar

Location

Room 211

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Discovery systems, the Google like library search engines, have become popular search tools in many academic libraries. At meantime, Google Scholar still plays a major role as a gateway to research for many professors and students. The single search tools give the user a broader range of resources and a wider choice in results efficiently. But this also shows that some results are not as good as when searching in subject specific databases which retrieve relevant results more effectively. Teaching information literacy explaining the differences between various search engines and engaging students in information evaluation skills with different search results can be challenging for instructors, in particular, within one shot library instruction.

This presentation addresses the strengths and weaknesses of single search products and some databases including PRIMO Central, Google Scholar, IEEE Explore, Project Muse and Business Source Premier, and demonstrates the problems that students faced with various search tools. Students usually rely too much on simple keyword searches or sentence searches, but lack evaluation skills. When facing overwhelming number of retrievals, some students have problems identifying appropriate resources and refining searches for a better result. This presentation also discusses how to provide project-based practices and discovery learning exercises to help students understand common information navigation techniques that can be applied to all search tools and improve their critical thinking skillstomake information search not just efficient but effective.

Presentation Description

This presentation addresses the strengths and weaknesses of library search products and demonstrates the problems that students faced with various tools. This presentation also discusses how to provide project-based practices and discovery learning exercises to help students understand common information navigation techniques that can be applied to all search tools and improve their critical thinking skills to make information search not just efficient but effective.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 2:45 PM Sep 25th, 4:00 PM

Dilemmas in Teaching Information Search Tools: Discovery Systems, Subject Specific Databases or Google Scholar

Room 211

Discovery systems, the Google like library search engines, have become popular search tools in many academic libraries. At meantime, Google Scholar still plays a major role as a gateway to research for many professors and students. The single search tools give the user a broader range of resources and a wider choice in results efficiently. But this also shows that some results are not as good as when searching in subject specific databases which retrieve relevant results more effectively. Teaching information literacy explaining the differences between various search engines and engaging students in information evaluation skills with different search results can be challenging for instructors, in particular, within one shot library instruction.

This presentation addresses the strengths and weaknesses of single search products and some databases including PRIMO Central, Google Scholar, IEEE Explore, Project Muse and Business Source Premier, and demonstrates the problems that students faced with various search tools. Students usually rely too much on simple keyword searches or sentence searches, but lack evaluation skills. When facing overwhelming number of retrievals, some students have problems identifying appropriate resources and refining searches for a better result. This presentation also discusses how to provide project-based practices and discovery learning exercises to help students understand common information navigation techniques that can be applied to all search tools and improve their critical thinking skillstomake information search not just efficient but effective.