Presentation Title

Small Library/Big Role: Promoting Information Literacy at a Commuter Campus

Location

Room 218/220

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

The panelists are head librarians at two different small libraries at commuter campuses within the same multi-campus university. This university consists of four campuses total, out of which only one offers the traditional residential setting. The panelists will present strategies and techniques for ensuring that their students receive guidance as “consumers and creators of information who can participate successfully in collaborative spaces” (Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education). The panelists will also discuss expectations versus realistic delivery of materials, services, hours, and staffing for each of their libraries. The discussion describes the advantages that benefit the promotion of information literacy in a small commuter campus library: smaller class sizes, rapid feedback loops, support from the local campus community, and enhanced offerings of information resources as part of a large university library system. Alternatively, the panelists will discuss overcoming challenges that can hinder promoting information literacy: limited space for instruction and print materials, shortage of computer labs, fewer staff/less flexibility for desk coverage, greater percentage of adjunct/transient faculty and students, and potential isolation coupled with less face-to-face interaction/communication with peers from the other campuses. Overall, the discussion will be framed within the context of how the benefits and challenges can encourage or may inhibit student information literacy and in particular metaliteracy.

Presentation Description

The panelists, head librarians at two different small libraries at commuter campuses within the same multi-campus university, will present strategies and techniques for ensuring that their students receive guidance as “consumers and creators of information who can participate successfully in collaborative spaces” (Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education). The panelists will discuss the advantages that benefit the promotion of information literacy in a small commuter campus library as well as strategies for overcoming challenges that can hinder promoting information literacy and in particular metaliteracy.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 4:15 PM Sep 25th, 5:30 PM

Small Library/Big Role: Promoting Information Literacy at a Commuter Campus

Room 218/220

The panelists are head librarians at two different small libraries at commuter campuses within the same multi-campus university. This university consists of four campuses total, out of which only one offers the traditional residential setting. The panelists will present strategies and techniques for ensuring that their students receive guidance as “consumers and creators of information who can participate successfully in collaborative spaces” (Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education). The panelists will also discuss expectations versus realistic delivery of materials, services, hours, and staffing for each of their libraries. The discussion describes the advantages that benefit the promotion of information literacy in a small commuter campus library: smaller class sizes, rapid feedback loops, support from the local campus community, and enhanced offerings of information resources as part of a large university library system. Alternatively, the panelists will discuss overcoming challenges that can hinder promoting information literacy: limited space for instruction and print materials, shortage of computer labs, fewer staff/less flexibility for desk coverage, greater percentage of adjunct/transient faculty and students, and potential isolation coupled with less face-to-face interaction/communication with peers from the other campuses. Overall, the discussion will be framed within the context of how the benefits and challenges can encourage or may inhibit student information literacy and in particular metaliteracy.