Location

Room 218/220

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Members of this panel, an instructional design librarian and a teaching faculty member, began collaborating in summer 2014 to revise and redesign English 305: Scientific and Technical Writing; the faculty instructor wanted to improve this course by redesigning it based on instructional design principles, but also to include more information literacy instruction into this online course.

This panel will discuss faculty’s perceived problems with the initial version of the class, including lack of student participation and poor choices of research materials for assignments. We will discuss how we tried to eliminate those deficiencies through instructional design and redesigning authentic assignments related to scientific and technical writing as well using the new ACRL Information Literacy Framework to help structure the assignments and assessments.

This panel will share results from two semesters of pre and post-tests as well as results from a citation analysis of the students’ work. We will also discuss successful lesson plans, assignments, and assessments designed for the online environments in addition to digital learning objects and a LibGuide created for instructional support.

This session will be relevant to academic librarians currently embedded in online courses, collaborating with faculty, or those planning to do so. This session will also provide librarians with a set of best practices to help effectively create digital learning objects for students in an online course. Attendees will also learn simple instructional design principles that can be implemented in most instructional contexts. We will also share successful lesson plans, rubrics, and assessments.

Presentation Description

The panel participants, an instructional design librarian and a teaching faculty member, will discuss how they revised an online scientific and technical writing class to encourage greater student participation and better performance on researched assignments. The session will cover how instructional design principles were implemented as well as how research assignments were redesigned for greater authenticity using the new ACRL Information Literacy Framework. This panel will be relevant to academic librarians currently embedded in online courses, collaborating with faculty, or those planning to do so. This session will also provide librarians with sample assignments and assessments as well as describe how simple instructional design principles can be implemented in most instructional contexts.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Sep 25th, 1:15 PM Sep 25th, 2:30 PM

Rebooting a Technical Writing Course: Control Instructional Design, Alt Information Literacy, and Delete Non-Collaboration

Room 218/220

Members of this panel, an instructional design librarian and a teaching faculty member, began collaborating in summer 2014 to revise and redesign English 305: Scientific and Technical Writing; the faculty instructor wanted to improve this course by redesigning it based on instructional design principles, but also to include more information literacy instruction into this online course.

This panel will discuss faculty’s perceived problems with the initial version of the class, including lack of student participation and poor choices of research materials for assignments. We will discuss how we tried to eliminate those deficiencies through instructional design and redesigning authentic assignments related to scientific and technical writing as well using the new ACRL Information Literacy Framework to help structure the assignments and assessments.

This panel will share results from two semesters of pre and post-tests as well as results from a citation analysis of the students’ work. We will also discuss successful lesson plans, assignments, and assessments designed for the online environments in addition to digital learning objects and a LibGuide created for instructional support.

This session will be relevant to academic librarians currently embedded in online courses, collaborating with faculty, or those planning to do so. This session will also provide librarians with a set of best practices to help effectively create digital learning objects for students in an online course. Attendees will also learn simple instructional design principles that can be implemented in most instructional contexts. We will also share successful lesson plans, rubrics, and assessments.