Presentation Title

Meaningful Gamification of Business Writing

Location

Room 1220 B

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

In recent years, a great deal of discussion on the subject of gamification of the classroom has taken place, much of it focused on how game structures can or cannot increase student engagement, enjoyment, and perception of transfer of classroom-based knowledge. However, little of the discussion has spoken to how the use of game-like structures, especially simulation, can promote and deepen student understanding of information literacy, especially the ways in which primary quantitative data can be gathered, represented, and contextualized through secondary research. This presentation will discuss the structure of a gamified business writing course and how that structure helps students build on their previously established information literacy skills in ways students had not previously considered. Data gathered from an IRB-approved study will be used to support the efficacy of this approach along with samples of student-produced works.

Presentation Description

Gamification has been widely discussed in recent years, but rarely has the use of gamification or simulation as a way to promote and contextualize information literacy been the focus. This presentation discusses a gamified business writing course and how it promotes student comprehension of primary research methodologies and representation as well as the contextualization of that information within secondary research.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 4:15 PM Sep 25th, 5:30 PM

Meaningful Gamification of Business Writing

Room 1220 B

In recent years, a great deal of discussion on the subject of gamification of the classroom has taken place, much of it focused on how game structures can or cannot increase student engagement, enjoyment, and perception of transfer of classroom-based knowledge. However, little of the discussion has spoken to how the use of game-like structures, especially simulation, can promote and deepen student understanding of information literacy, especially the ways in which primary quantitative data can be gathered, represented, and contextualized through secondary research. This presentation will discuss the structure of a gamified business writing course and how that structure helps students build on their previously established information literacy skills in ways students had not previously considered. Data gathered from an IRB-approved study will be used to support the efficacy of this approach along with samples of student-produced works.