Location

Room 217

Type of Presentation

Workshop (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

“Scholarship is a Conversation,” involves mastering disciplinary ways of thinking and communicating including using nuances in syntax, specialized vocabulary and subject-appropriate evidence to convey ideas in an appropriate medium or genre, shaped for a particular audience and context. We asked ourselves: What developmentally appropriate sequence could we craft to teach this concept that might serve as a model for other teaching librarians across institutions? How could students learn a rhetorically-nuanced inquiry process that would enable them to weigh and weave source ideas into a multicolored tapestry in their own voices? We will share our initial work to introduce “Scholarship is a Conversation” in the context of the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences and invite you to think about ways to translate this to your own teaching.

Presentation Description

“Scholarship is a Conversation,” involves mastering disciplinary ways of thinking and communicating. At the heart of synthesis students just learn to weigh and weave sources into a multicolored tapestry in their own voices. What developmentally appropriate sequence could we craft to teach disciplinary conversation that might serve as a model for other teaching librarians across institutions?

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Sep 26th, 11:15 AM Sep 26th, 12:45 PM

Designing Backwards from College to High School: Practical Insights about Teaching Threshold Concepts

Room 217

“Scholarship is a Conversation,” involves mastering disciplinary ways of thinking and communicating including using nuances in syntax, specialized vocabulary and subject-appropriate evidence to convey ideas in an appropriate medium or genre, shaped for a particular audience and context. We asked ourselves: What developmentally appropriate sequence could we craft to teach this concept that might serve as a model for other teaching librarians across institutions? How could students learn a rhetorically-nuanced inquiry process that would enable them to weigh and weave source ideas into a multicolored tapestry in their own voices? We will share our initial work to introduce “Scholarship is a Conversation” in the context of the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences and invite you to think about ways to translate this to your own teaching.