Location

Room 211

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Undergraduate students work to master information literacy skills, which encompass concepts such as resource-based learning, effective research and information use. In addition, these students must also develop the ability to effectively collaborate, produce, and share content across the increasingly complex digital information landscape. Mackey and Jacobson (2014) have proposed reframing information literacy as a comprehensive “metaliteracy” model that encompasses the participatory nature of the digital environment.

Since 2012, librarians have worked with New College of Florida faculty to leverage Wikipedia as a tool to facilitate student development of metaliteracy skills. Students taking humanities and social science courses critically analyze existing Wikipedia articles, assess information gaps, identify and evaluate sources, add new content using WikiCode, and develop a deeper understanding of collaborative authorship. During the January 2015 term, the first Wikipedia Independent Study Project (ISP) was offered, where students developed expertise in an area of interest and made substantive contributions to Wikipedia under the supervision of a librarian.

In this presentation, the authors will illustrate the myriad ways that Wikipedia-based assignments and ISPs facilitate student achievement of metaliteracy skills and the information literacy skills set forth in the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (ACRL, 2000), as well as the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (ACRL, 2015).

Presentation Description

Undergraduate students work to master information literacy skills, which encompass concepts such as resource-based learning, effective research and information use. In addition, these students must also develop the ability to effectively collaborate, produce, and share content across the increasingly complex digital information landscape. Wikipedia is an effective tool that can be used in course-based assignments as well as independent study projects to facilitate information literacy skill development.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License

Wiki_markup_cheatsheet_EN.pdf (126 kB)
Wikipedia educational material

UsingTalkPages.pdf (88 kB)
Wikipedia educational material

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Sep 26th, 9:45 AM Sep 26th, 11:00 AM

Wikipedia: Information literacy in the digital landscape

Room 211

Undergraduate students work to master information literacy skills, which encompass concepts such as resource-based learning, effective research and information use. In addition, these students must also develop the ability to effectively collaborate, produce, and share content across the increasingly complex digital information landscape. Mackey and Jacobson (2014) have proposed reframing information literacy as a comprehensive “metaliteracy” model that encompasses the participatory nature of the digital environment.

Since 2012, librarians have worked with New College of Florida faculty to leverage Wikipedia as a tool to facilitate student development of metaliteracy skills. Students taking humanities and social science courses critically analyze existing Wikipedia articles, assess information gaps, identify and evaluate sources, add new content using WikiCode, and develop a deeper understanding of collaborative authorship. During the January 2015 term, the first Wikipedia Independent Study Project (ISP) was offered, where students developed expertise in an area of interest and made substantive contributions to Wikipedia under the supervision of a librarian.

In this presentation, the authors will illustrate the myriad ways that Wikipedia-based assignments and ISPs facilitate student achievement of metaliteracy skills and the information literacy skills set forth in the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (ACRL, 2000), as well as the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (ACRL, 2015).