Location

Room 1220A

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Other

Academic librarians who want to develop or change their partnerships with other faculty members or programs in order to enhance the library's involvement in teaching research skills; post-secondary teachers who want to develop or change their partnerships with librarians; any librarians who want to develop or change their partnerships with teachers.

Abstract

Under the category of “PARTNERSHIPS between librarians and classroom teachers to teach students research skills,” I will share with attendees how to develop a new partnership (or change an existing one) with a faculty member based on a change in curriculum.

As the Liaison Librarian for the English Language Institute (ELI)—an intensive English language program for international students who are preparing to begin undergraduate or graduate studies in the US—I regularly taught the library component of ELI Research Skills classes.

Recently, however, the curriculum changed. Now, there is no longer a formal ELI class called "Research Skills." However, components of research skills (i.e. reading academic articles, paraphrasing, producing a written product) remain. They are now included in newly developed, separate ELI reading and writing classes. In addition to the specific process I will recently have experienced by the time of the conference--including meeting with ELI program management and ELI faculty, I will also share concrete details--including evolution of teaching method, time and number of classes, outcomes and assessment.

Previously, I had proposed a presentation about the "CCC's of partnership"--because selected key concepts all begin with the letter C (like collaborate, communicate, compromise, capitalize and crystallize). Now, however, what I actually experience (my first meeting with ELI management takes place during the first week of August) will shape the concepts that I will report on in my presentation. One concept that I already know that I will include is “N is for Nimble.”

Attendees can adapt these concepts--as well as learn from my recent experience--to use in their own settings, regardless of students' ages, backgrounds or nationalities.

Presentation Description

Under the category of “PARTNERSHIPS between librarians and classroom teachers to teach students research skills,” come to learn about developing a new partnership (or changing an existing one) with a faculty member based on a change in curriculum. Until recently, I regularly taught the library component of Research Skills classes. Not long ago, however, the curriculum changed. Now, there is no longer a formal class called "Research Skills." However, components of research skills (i.e. reading academic articles, paraphrasing, producing a written product) remain. Join me as I report on my recent experience as well as selected crucial concepts—including “N is for Nimble.” I’ve identified the CCC’s of partnership. Not the ABC’s but, rather, the CCC’s—because these concepts all begin with the letter C. Here are just a few C words that represent more detailed content: Communicate, compromise, and capitalize. These hopefully memorable concepts can help to enhance your partnership.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Oct 10th, 2:45 PM Oct 10th, 4:00 PM

Developing Partnerships: Be NIMBLE

Room 1220A

Under the category of “PARTNERSHIPS between librarians and classroom teachers to teach students research skills,” I will share with attendees how to develop a new partnership (or change an existing one) with a faculty member based on a change in curriculum.

As the Liaison Librarian for the English Language Institute (ELI)—an intensive English language program for international students who are preparing to begin undergraduate or graduate studies in the US—I regularly taught the library component of ELI Research Skills classes.

Recently, however, the curriculum changed. Now, there is no longer a formal ELI class called "Research Skills." However, components of research skills (i.e. reading academic articles, paraphrasing, producing a written product) remain. They are now included in newly developed, separate ELI reading and writing classes. In addition to the specific process I will recently have experienced by the time of the conference--including meeting with ELI program management and ELI faculty, I will also share concrete details--including evolution of teaching method, time and number of classes, outcomes and assessment.

Previously, I had proposed a presentation about the "CCC's of partnership"--because selected key concepts all begin with the letter C (like collaborate, communicate, compromise, capitalize and crystallize). Now, however, what I actually experience (my first meeting with ELI management takes place during the first week of August) will shape the concepts that I will report on in my presentation. One concept that I already know that I will include is “N is for Nimble.”

Attendees can adapt these concepts--as well as learn from my recent experience--to use in their own settings, regardless of students' ages, backgrounds or nationalities.