Presentation Title

Librarians and Teachers in Tandem: Preventing Plagiarism in our Digital Age

Location

Lobby

Type of Presentation

Poster Session (45 minutes)

Target Audience

K-12

Abstract

Professors and college/university research librarians have unique opportunities to work together to build information literacy skills of undergraduate students that both groups encounter. One can introduce, and the other can follow-up with the same important information that is impacted by a variety of literacy skills. For example, the instructor may want to address initially the importance of how freshmen should skim materials necessary for basic class understanding. The librarian working with the instructor can engage the class in ways to differentiate between whether skimming or scanning is the better choice for the assignment provided. Having in-class and then in the library sessions at the beginning of the semester can greatly benefit the freshman writing that first college paper.

How best to conduct in-depth reading after skimming and scanning, can again be approached in class and in a group session in the library. For example, when to determine if the information incorporated needs sources cited or how to be evaluate the credibility of an information source. Both can assist students individually or in groups to review criteria necessary for determining credibility of sources selected. It is likely that librarians and teachers working together can reach freshman writing that first paper who must answer questions such as:

• How do I create a plan to locate and organize relevant information?

• What criteria do I choose to evaluate the credibility of an information source?

• How do I as a freshman determine if the use of information even requires citing a source?

• How do I distinguish between popular sources and scholarly sources?

• How do I differentiate between primary and secondary sources?

• How do I make use of continually emerging innovations in information technology?

• How do I evaluate critically the variety of benefits of the information provided?

• How do I make sure that I have documented well and avoided plagiarism at all costs?

• How do I express the information learned in a meaningful manner?

The teacher and librarian can work together (not just in one-shot instances) to enable the freshman student to locate, understand, evaluate and use information effectively from print, electronic and visual media.

Presentation Description

In today's digital age it is more important than ever for teachers and media specialists to work together to be sure that students understand what is meant by "plagiarsim." Teachers and media specialists working together in tandem to be assured that students cite sources carefully and correctly will go a long way in reinforcing to students that one must avoid at all costs submitting work as if it is one' own when it is not! Ways to assure that students do not plagiarize will be demonstrated in this poster session.

Keywords

plagiarism, co-teaching, teaching in-tandem

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 1:30 PM Oct 10th, 5:00 PM

Librarians and Teachers in Tandem: Preventing Plagiarism in our Digital Age

Lobby

Professors and college/university research librarians have unique opportunities to work together to build information literacy skills of undergraduate students that both groups encounter. One can introduce, and the other can follow-up with the same important information that is impacted by a variety of literacy skills. For example, the instructor may want to address initially the importance of how freshmen should skim materials necessary for basic class understanding. The librarian working with the instructor can engage the class in ways to differentiate between whether skimming or scanning is the better choice for the assignment provided. Having in-class and then in the library sessions at the beginning of the semester can greatly benefit the freshman writing that first college paper.

How best to conduct in-depth reading after skimming and scanning, can again be approached in class and in a group session in the library. For example, when to determine if the information incorporated needs sources cited or how to be evaluate the credibility of an information source. Both can assist students individually or in groups to review criteria necessary for determining credibility of sources selected. It is likely that librarians and teachers working together can reach freshman writing that first paper who must answer questions such as:

• How do I create a plan to locate and organize relevant information?

• What criteria do I choose to evaluate the credibility of an information source?

• How do I as a freshman determine if the use of information even requires citing a source?

• How do I distinguish between popular sources and scholarly sources?

• How do I differentiate between primary and secondary sources?

• How do I make use of continually emerging innovations in information technology?

• How do I evaluate critically the variety of benefits of the information provided?

• How do I make sure that I have documented well and avoided plagiarism at all costs?

• How do I express the information learned in a meaningful manner?

The teacher and librarian can work together (not just in one-shot instances) to enable the freshman student to locate, understand, evaluate and use information effectively from print, electronic and visual media.