Presentation Title

Teaching and Learning Information Literacy: Embedded Library Science Students in Undergraduate English Courses

Location

Room 1220A

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Inspired by recent research demonstrating that embedded librarianship—a practice in which librarians function as co-teachers in traditional courses—yields impressive results in terms of students’ information literacy gains, the researchers have developed a project in which Library Science students enrolled in Information Sources and Services (traditionally known as “Reference Class”) serve as embedded librarians for groups of first and second-year composition students. The library science students practice their bibliographic instruction, reference interview, and searching skills by helping the English students to define their research topics, locate and evaluate relevant sources of information, and properly cite and document that information. After some brief background concerning rationale and logistics, the researchers will share comparative data related to the research sample and a control group of undergraduate Composition students, including the results of pre and post information literacy surveys as well as statistics regarding the number and quality of sources cited by each group. In addition to illustrating the increase in the information literacy skills of the participating undergraduate students, this data will allow us to suggest some improvements for future embedded librarianship scenarios, particularly those involving Library Science students. Finally, the researchers will touch briefly on the impact of the project on Library Science students’ ability to teach information literacy skills within an embedded librarianship context.

Presentation Description

Inspired by recent research demonstrating that embedded librarianship—a practice in which librarians function as co-teachers in traditional courses—yields impressive results in terms of students’ information literacy gains, the researchers have developed a project in which Library Science students enrolled in Information Sources and Services (traditionally known as “Reference Class”) serve as embedded librarians for groups of first and second-year composition students. The library science students practice their bibliographic instruction, reference interview, and searching skills by helping the English students to define their research topics, locate and evaluate relevant sources of information, and properly cite and document that information. After some brief background concerning rationale and logistics, the researchers will share comparative data related to the research sample and a control group of undergraduate Composition students, including the results of pre and post information literacy surveys as well as statistics regarding the number and quality of sources cited by each group.

Keywords

Expository Writing, Research, Composition, Library Science, Embedded Librarianship, Experiential Learning

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 1:15 PM Oct 10th, 2:30 PM

Teaching and Learning Information Literacy: Embedded Library Science Students in Undergraduate English Courses

Room 1220A

Inspired by recent research demonstrating that embedded librarianship—a practice in which librarians function as co-teachers in traditional courses—yields impressive results in terms of students’ information literacy gains, the researchers have developed a project in which Library Science students enrolled in Information Sources and Services (traditionally known as “Reference Class”) serve as embedded librarians for groups of first and second-year composition students. The library science students practice their bibliographic instruction, reference interview, and searching skills by helping the English students to define their research topics, locate and evaluate relevant sources of information, and properly cite and document that information. After some brief background concerning rationale and logistics, the researchers will share comparative data related to the research sample and a control group of undergraduate Composition students, including the results of pre and post information literacy surveys as well as statistics regarding the number and quality of sources cited by each group. In addition to illustrating the increase in the information literacy skills of the participating undergraduate students, this data will allow us to suggest some improvements for future embedded librarianship scenarios, particularly those involving Library Science students. Finally, the researchers will touch briefly on the impact of the project on Library Science students’ ability to teach information literacy skills within an embedded librarianship context.