Presentation Title

Out of the Box Rubrics: Designing Course-Integrated Assessments for Faculty Use

Location

Room 129

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Assessment of student learning is becoming routine in higher education as colleges and universities are increasingly under pressure from stakeholders to demonstrate evidence that undergraduate students are achieving intended learning outcomes. Information literacy is often identified as a key competency for students to master within general education programs or specific disciplines, yet very few academic departments or programs include formal information literacy outcomes or even assessment methods in their disciplinary curriculum. Indeed, Gilchrist and Oakleaf (2012) have argued that "faculty may not practice the same scaffolded, developmental approach to information literacy outcomes that they employ in the teaching of their own discipline." This presentation will highlight the results from an analysis of English syllabi and course-related research assignment handouts at Temple University, noting how English faculty communicate information literacy outcomes to students. The presenter will then discuss the process of creating and promoting a toolkit of assessable information literacy outcomes and corresponding rubrics for faculty use in their courses. Attendees will become familiar with the benefits of using rubrics as an assessment method in addition to best practices for designing rubrics for non-librarians that describe what information literacy skills and concepts look like when applied in context.

Presentation Description

This presentation will highlight the results from an analysis of English syllabi and course-related research assignment handouts at Temple University, noting how English faculty communicate information literacy outcomes to students. The presenter will then discuss the process of creating and promoting a toolkit of assessable information literacy outcomes and corresponding rubrics for faculty use in their courses. Attendees will become familiar with the benefits of using rubrics as an assessment method in addition to best practices for designing rubrics for non-librarians that describe what information literacy skills and concepts look like when applied in context.

Keywords

assessment, curriculum, outcomes, rubrics, outreach

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 10:00 AM Oct 10th, 11:30 AM

Out of the Box Rubrics: Designing Course-Integrated Assessments for Faculty Use

Room 129

Assessment of student learning is becoming routine in higher education as colleges and universities are increasingly under pressure from stakeholders to demonstrate evidence that undergraduate students are achieving intended learning outcomes. Information literacy is often identified as a key competency for students to master within general education programs or specific disciplines, yet very few academic departments or programs include formal information literacy outcomes or even assessment methods in their disciplinary curriculum. Indeed, Gilchrist and Oakleaf (2012) have argued that "faculty may not practice the same scaffolded, developmental approach to information literacy outcomes that they employ in the teaching of their own discipline." This presentation will highlight the results from an analysis of English syllabi and course-related research assignment handouts at Temple University, noting how English faculty communicate information literacy outcomes to students. The presenter will then discuss the process of creating and promoting a toolkit of assessable information literacy outcomes and corresponding rubrics for faculty use in their courses. Attendees will become familiar with the benefits of using rubrics as an assessment method in addition to best practices for designing rubrics for non-librarians that describe what information literacy skills and concepts look like when applied in context.