Location

Room 211

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Members of this panel (a librarian and faculty member) began collaborating to create information literacy sessions for English 272: Modernist Literature. Assuming that students enrolled would be English majors or similar, we created sessions and assignments focused on higher-order research skills, such as working with and analyzing primary sources.

However, this section of English 272 fulfilled a General Education Curriculum (GEC) requirement. At our institution, students take 43 credit hours to fulfill GEC requirements, courses from a broad range of disciplines. Unfortunately, many students enroll in GEC courses for which they are under-prepared, have no personal interest, and are not requirements for their majors. Our initial sessions were not successful.

This panel will describe the mistakes we made in our first GEC course, but more importantly, what we learned, and how we improved instruction to reach students at varying of levels of fluency. We will share results from pre and post-tests performed from that initial session as well as student responses and feedback from the subsequent improved information literacy sessions. We will also discuss successful assignments and in-class activities for classes of mixed information literacy fluency.

This session will be relevant to academic librarians currently collaborating with faculty not only teaching GEC-style courses and literature courses, but any course which contains a wide-range of student experience and ability. This panel will be helpful for librarians wanting to collaborate with faculty, giving them a blueprint for lesson planning. This session will also provide give librarians with a set of best practices to help effectively create information literacy sessions for classes with a range of student skills.

Presentation Description

Members of this panel (a librarian and faculty member) will discuss their collaboration creating information literacy sessions for English 272: Modernist Literature, a course which fulfilled a General Education Curriculum requirement. The initial sessions were less than successful due to our assumption of who are students would be and their skills and who the students actually were. This session will be relevant to academic librarians collaborating with faculty teaching literature courses and will also provide librarians with a set of best practices to help effectively create information literacy sessions to reach all students at varying levels of fluency.

Keywords

information literacy; faculty collaboration; higher education; literature

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 8:30 AM Oct 10th, 9:45 AM

The Best Laid Plans of Librarians and Faculty: Information Literacy Instruction in a General Education Literature Course, Difficulties and Successes

Room 211

Members of this panel (a librarian and faculty member) began collaborating to create information literacy sessions for English 272: Modernist Literature. Assuming that students enrolled would be English majors or similar, we created sessions and assignments focused on higher-order research skills, such as working with and analyzing primary sources.

However, this section of English 272 fulfilled a General Education Curriculum (GEC) requirement. At our institution, students take 43 credit hours to fulfill GEC requirements, courses from a broad range of disciplines. Unfortunately, many students enroll in GEC courses for which they are under-prepared, have no personal interest, and are not requirements for their majors. Our initial sessions were not successful.

This panel will describe the mistakes we made in our first GEC course, but more importantly, what we learned, and how we improved instruction to reach students at varying of levels of fluency. We will share results from pre and post-tests performed from that initial session as well as student responses and feedback from the subsequent improved information literacy sessions. We will also discuss successful assignments and in-class activities for classes of mixed information literacy fluency.

This session will be relevant to academic librarians currently collaborating with faculty not only teaching GEC-style courses and literature courses, but any course which contains a wide-range of student experience and ability. This panel will be helpful for librarians wanting to collaborate with faculty, giving them a blueprint for lesson planning. This session will also provide give librarians with a set of best practices to help effectively create information literacy sessions for classes with a range of student skills.