Presentation Title

International Perspectives on Information Literacy: A Panel Discussion

Location

Room 210

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

What does information literacy look like as Western style education is exported globally? How do we assess the outcome of these programs in an age where technologies are rapidly changing? Three Canadian academic librarians, one working in Canada at an internationally recognized university, one in Hong Kong at an art school and one at a vocational college in the Arabian emirate of Qatar speak about what information literacy competency and education means for them and their students. The panelists will discuss Millennials in the global context, their unique institutions and a moderator will lead a discussion regarding the similarities and differences in how they approach information literacy instruction and assessment. Outside of North America, many post-secondary institutions have adopted the American or Canadian model. In Canada, many students are international students, new Canadians, or first generation Canadians and college students. In both contexts, students have a wide range in language skills, prior research experience and information literacy skills. The discussion will include topics such as third culture kids and their information literacy needs, working with faculty members in high-turnover schools, extending reference services and learning using online tools, and minimizing library jargon in an English environment, curriculum mapping to facilitate sustainable growth of information literacy programs, and the challenges with assessing and evaluating these programs. In addition, each librarian will discuss how they support the curriculum and prepare their students who will be entering the workforce in rapidly growing fields and industries. While the experiences of the librarians are diverse and global, there are familiar themes and challenges that are consistent. In a world where technologies are evolving and we are constantly fighting for resources, what can academic librarians do to provide relevant and timely information literacy instruction? We can all learn from each other.

Presentation Description

Three Canadian academic librarians, one working in Canada at an internationally recognized university, one in Hong Kong at an art school and one at a vocational college in the Arabian emirate of Qatar speak about what information literacy competency and education means for them and their students.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Oct 10th, 2:45 PM Oct 10th, 4:00 PM

International Perspectives on Information Literacy: A Panel Discussion

Room 210

What does information literacy look like as Western style education is exported globally? How do we assess the outcome of these programs in an age where technologies are rapidly changing? Three Canadian academic librarians, one working in Canada at an internationally recognized university, one in Hong Kong at an art school and one at a vocational college in the Arabian emirate of Qatar speak about what information literacy competency and education means for them and their students. The panelists will discuss Millennials in the global context, their unique institutions and a moderator will lead a discussion regarding the similarities and differences in how they approach information literacy instruction and assessment. Outside of North America, many post-secondary institutions have adopted the American or Canadian model. In Canada, many students are international students, new Canadians, or first generation Canadians and college students. In both contexts, students have a wide range in language skills, prior research experience and information literacy skills. The discussion will include topics such as third culture kids and their information literacy needs, working with faculty members in high-turnover schools, extending reference services and learning using online tools, and minimizing library jargon in an English environment, curriculum mapping to facilitate sustainable growth of information literacy programs, and the challenges with assessing and evaluating these programs. In addition, each librarian will discuss how they support the curriculum and prepare their students who will be entering the workforce in rapidly growing fields and industries. While the experiences of the librarians are diverse and global, there are familiar themes and challenges that are consistent. In a world where technologies are evolving and we are constantly fighting for resources, what can academic librarians do to provide relevant and timely information literacy instruction? We can all learn from each other.