Presentation Title

Creating Collaborative Conversations: How Initiatives to Improve Undergraduate Nursing Students’ Information Literacy Skills Benefits Students, Librarians and Nursing Faculty

Location

Lobby

Type of Presentation

Poster Session (45 minutes)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

IIn the spirit of the Association of College and Research Library (ACRL) Information Literacy Standards for Nursing (2013), a librarian and nursing faculty member partnered to improve nursing students’ information literacy skills across their curriculum. Efforts to cultivate APA citation skills and elevate the overall quality of undergraduate research led to improved outcomes that bridged the figurative and literal distance between the Library and the School of Nursing at a small, liberal arts college. This collaboration has encouraged a rich conversation about information literacy between faculty, students and the library. The resulting benefits are collaborative tools for all to use for both writing and grading papers, ongoing classroom instruction by the librarian liaison and nursing faculty at every course level, and tangible improvement in student performance of skills involved in information literacy. An appreciation of the value of library input into the classroom has been recognized by faculty and students alike at this school of nursing and has fostered a conversation on the future assessment of this collaboration. Options for assessment include development of a rubric to compare student's written work on admission to the program and in their senior year, surveys of nursing faculty and librarians' satisfaction with the students' progress, and evaluation of the students' attitudes toward information literacy at the beginning and end of their didactic nursing education. It is proposed that this collaboration will have a benefit beyond college as these students enter a career that notes the necessity of lifelong learning as a cornerstone of its professional tenets.

Presentation Description

In the spirit of the Association of College and Research Library (ACRL) Information Literacy Standards for Nursing (2013), a librarian and nursing faculty member partnered to improve nursing students’ information literacy skills. This poster will show how the collaborative effort to cultivate APA citation skills and elevate the quality of student research encouraged a rich conversation about information literacy between faculty, students and the library. Additionally, the poster will reveal the benefits of this collaboration, future assessment efforts and showcase the tools that emerged from the partnership.

Keywords

collaboration, research citations, information literacy, nursing, professionalism, citation instruction, partnership

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 1:30 PM Oct 10th, 5:00 PM

Creating Collaborative Conversations: How Initiatives to Improve Undergraduate Nursing Students’ Information Literacy Skills Benefits Students, Librarians and Nursing Faculty

Lobby

IIn the spirit of the Association of College and Research Library (ACRL) Information Literacy Standards for Nursing (2013), a librarian and nursing faculty member partnered to improve nursing students’ information literacy skills across their curriculum. Efforts to cultivate APA citation skills and elevate the overall quality of undergraduate research led to improved outcomes that bridged the figurative and literal distance between the Library and the School of Nursing at a small, liberal arts college. This collaboration has encouraged a rich conversation about information literacy between faculty, students and the library. The resulting benefits are collaborative tools for all to use for both writing and grading papers, ongoing classroom instruction by the librarian liaison and nursing faculty at every course level, and tangible improvement in student performance of skills involved in information literacy. An appreciation of the value of library input into the classroom has been recognized by faculty and students alike at this school of nursing and has fostered a conversation on the future assessment of this collaboration. Options for assessment include development of a rubric to compare student's written work on admission to the program and in their senior year, surveys of nursing faculty and librarians' satisfaction with the students' progress, and evaluation of the students' attitudes toward information literacy at the beginning and end of their didactic nursing education. It is proposed that this collaboration will have a benefit beyond college as these students enter a career that notes the necessity of lifelong learning as a cornerstone of its professional tenets.