Presentation Title

Affordable Information Literacy: Redefining Humanities Course Materials

Location

Room 1005

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

This presentation will demonstrate how librarians and teaching faculty collaborated in identifying affordable alternatives to textbooks for use in the university classroom. The presenters are members of a team who are responsible for gathering and developing Open Educational Resources (OER) and other digital materials for two required core courses— Humanities 2001 and 2002—at Georgia Regents University (GRU). This grant-funded project is part of a planned change in course design and will provide a foundation of materials that will be used repeatedly. The project impacts all undergraduate students who complete their core requirements at GRU.

Previously students are required to purchase multiple textbooks at a cost of approximately $500.00. Replacing textbooks with OERs, freely available digital resources, and online library resources has significantly reduced the cost for students. Additionally, resources include not just text-based materials, such as scholarly articles and e-books, but also other formats, such as podcasts and interactive websites, exposing students to a variety of information resources and a range of digital media.

Presenters will discuss project goals and outcomes, including expanding traditional methods of information delivery to promote an active learning environment that teaches students how to organize and communicate ideas effectively, as well as demonstrating to students that the authority of information is “constructed and textual” (Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, Draft 2, June 2014). Additionally, presenters will demonstrate how the project relates to the proposed revised draft framework for information literacy.

Presentation Description

This presentation will demonstrate how librarians and teaching faculty collaborated in identifying affordable alternatives to textbooks for use in two required core courses— Humanities 2001 and 2002—at Georgia Regents University (GRU). Presenters will discuss project goals and outcomes, including expanding traditional methods of information delivery to promote an active learning environment that teaches students how to organize and communicate ideas effectively. Additionally, presenters will demonstrate how the project relates to the proposed revised draft framework for information literacy.

Keywords

Open Educational Resources, Collaboration, Active Learning

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 8:30 AM Oct 10th, 9:45 AM

Affordable Information Literacy: Redefining Humanities Course Materials

Room 1005

This presentation will demonstrate how librarians and teaching faculty collaborated in identifying affordable alternatives to textbooks for use in the university classroom. The presenters are members of a team who are responsible for gathering and developing Open Educational Resources (OER) and other digital materials for two required core courses— Humanities 2001 and 2002—at Georgia Regents University (GRU). This grant-funded project is part of a planned change in course design and will provide a foundation of materials that will be used repeatedly. The project impacts all undergraduate students who complete their core requirements at GRU.

Previously students are required to purchase multiple textbooks at a cost of approximately $500.00. Replacing textbooks with OERs, freely available digital resources, and online library resources has significantly reduced the cost for students. Additionally, resources include not just text-based materials, such as scholarly articles and e-books, but also other formats, such as podcasts and interactive websites, exposing students to a variety of information resources and a range of digital media.

Presenters will discuss project goals and outcomes, including expanding traditional methods of information delivery to promote an active learning environment that teaches students how to organize and communicate ideas effectively, as well as demonstrating to students that the authority of information is “constructed and textual” (Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, Draft 2, June 2014). Additionally, presenters will demonstrate how the project relates to the proposed revised draft framework for information literacy.