Presentation Title

Teaching Global Literacy: A Successful Professor/Librarian Partnership

Location

Room 1220A

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

A panel comprised of an English Professor and a Librarian share their strategies for teaching a second semester English composition class emphasizing Global Literacy. In this partnership the English Professor offers students a choice of reading one of six International Detective novels, from either China, Laos, India, Botswana, Ghana, or Saudi Arabia. Each novel interweaves aspects of historical, political, and/or cultural elements of each country. For six weeks the professor uses scaffolding techniques building towards the final project, incorporating a poster and PowerPoint presentation. There is a flipped classroom component, with a preliminary research assignment in preparation to meeting with the librarian.

Supporting this research, the librarian has created a LibGuide with tabs for each country. The LibGuide includes cultural links including language instruction, dance, food, music, newspapers, and more. We encourage students to suggest additional website links vetted via the librarian, which invites discussion about source reliability. The librarian is embedded in the classroom for three sessions. She teaches research techniques of analyzing and recognizing authentic, reliable, and credible sources. Copyright, Fair Use, and intellectual property concepts are addressed using examples from Flickr, GALILEO, and YouTube. Classroom time is given for research so that students can ask questions at their point of need. Works cited pages, attribution, and best practices for using multimedia are emphasized. Assessment strategies include writing a short essay describing the research process, as well as pre- and post- tests.

The students sifting through visual sources is exciting research for them. The final project requires finding multimedia sources, such as images and video, tied to both the novel and its country, thus expanding students’ global literacy and awareness. The pedagogical global elements presented have broad applications well suited for classes in English, History, Sociology, Religion, Anthropology, or Political Science.

Presentation Description

A panel comprised of an English Professor and a Librarian share their strategies for teaching a second semester English composition class with an emphasis on Global Literacy. This partnership has the English Professor offer students a choice of reading one of six International Detective novels. The librarian has created a Libguide with cultural links and is embedded within the classroom.

Keywords

Global Literacy, Library Instruction, Flipped Classroom, Scaffolding, Composition

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 11th, 9:45 AM Oct 11th, 11:00 AM

Teaching Global Literacy: A Successful Professor/Librarian Partnership

Room 1220A

A panel comprised of an English Professor and a Librarian share their strategies for teaching a second semester English composition class emphasizing Global Literacy. In this partnership the English Professor offers students a choice of reading one of six International Detective novels, from either China, Laos, India, Botswana, Ghana, or Saudi Arabia. Each novel interweaves aspects of historical, political, and/or cultural elements of each country. For six weeks the professor uses scaffolding techniques building towards the final project, incorporating a poster and PowerPoint presentation. There is a flipped classroom component, with a preliminary research assignment in preparation to meeting with the librarian.

Supporting this research, the librarian has created a LibGuide with tabs for each country. The LibGuide includes cultural links including language instruction, dance, food, music, newspapers, and more. We encourage students to suggest additional website links vetted via the librarian, which invites discussion about source reliability. The librarian is embedded in the classroom for three sessions. She teaches research techniques of analyzing and recognizing authentic, reliable, and credible sources. Copyright, Fair Use, and intellectual property concepts are addressed using examples from Flickr, GALILEO, and YouTube. Classroom time is given for research so that students can ask questions at their point of need. Works cited pages, attribution, and best practices for using multimedia are emphasized. Assessment strategies include writing a short essay describing the research process, as well as pre- and post- tests.

The students sifting through visual sources is exciting research for them. The final project requires finding multimedia sources, such as images and video, tied to both the novel and its country, thus expanding students’ global literacy and awareness. The pedagogical global elements presented have broad applications well suited for classes in English, History, Sociology, Religion, Anthropology, or Political Science.