Location

Room 218

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

K-12

Abstract

Despite being dubbed the Digital Generation, information literacy skills do not come automatically to high school students. Teachers and library media specialists must work together to provide quality strategies and scaffolds that help students evaluate sources authentically. Whether modeling the digital search process, creating pathfinders to direct students toward authoritative sources, or initiating discussions with students about quality resources, the library media specialist can become a valuable instructional partner to the classroom teacher.

The presenter, who has served as a high school media specialist, will discuss specific lesson plans she has co-taught with classroom teachers (as time allows). Topics may include consumerism in Of Mice and Men (American Literature), the labor force participation rate (AP Economics), “Are humans inherently good or evil?”, the Bill of Rights today (US History), ancestry (AP Human Geography), primary source DBQs (AP US History), “Is justice always served?” in To Kill a Mockingbird (9th Grade Literature), college-level research resources (Tools for College Success class), and the Language Arts department-wide annotated bibliography process.

The focus of the session will be to generate quality discussion about the ways in which teachers and librarians can direct students toward quality, authoritative sources without excessive hand-holding or the stifling of creativity. Input is welcome from audience members who have used similar strategies successfully at their own institutions.

Presentation Description

Despite being dubbed the Digital Generation, information literacy skills do not come automatically to high school students. Teachers and library media specialists must work together to provide quality strategies that help students evaluate sources authentically. Whether modeling the digital search process, creating pathfinders to direct students toward authoritative sources, or initiating discussions with students about quality resources, the library media specialist can become a valuable instructional partner to the classroom teacher. The presenter, who has served as a high school media specialist, will discuss specific lesson plans she has co-taught with classroom teachers in language arts, social studies, and science.

Keywords

information literacy, high school, library media specialist, scaffolding information

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 11th, 11:15 AM Oct 11th, 12:45 PM

Information Literacy Scaffolds in the 9-12 Classroom

Room 218

Despite being dubbed the Digital Generation, information literacy skills do not come automatically to high school students. Teachers and library media specialists must work together to provide quality strategies and scaffolds that help students evaluate sources authentically. Whether modeling the digital search process, creating pathfinders to direct students toward authoritative sources, or initiating discussions with students about quality resources, the library media specialist can become a valuable instructional partner to the classroom teacher.

The presenter, who has served as a high school media specialist, will discuss specific lesson plans she has co-taught with classroom teachers (as time allows). Topics may include consumerism in Of Mice and Men (American Literature), the labor force participation rate (AP Economics), “Are humans inherently good or evil?”, the Bill of Rights today (US History), ancestry (AP Human Geography), primary source DBQs (AP US History), “Is justice always served?” in To Kill a Mockingbird (9th Grade Literature), college-level research resources (Tools for College Success class), and the Language Arts department-wide annotated bibliography process.

The focus of the session will be to generate quality discussion about the ways in which teachers and librarians can direct students toward quality, authoritative sources without excessive hand-holding or the stifling of creativity. Input is welcome from audience members who have used similar strategies successfully at their own institutions.