Location

Room 218

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

There have been many approaches to information literacy education at academic institutions, and many positive outcomes from these efforts. Still, there is need for more research, exploration, and professional communication among librarians to identify information literacy teaching methods that have a consistent and long-lasting impact. Librarians at Indiana University-Bloomington embraced the announcement for information literacy in the General Education requirements as an opportunity to evolve the instruction program from an ad-hoc, decentralized program into one that is based on measurable and achievable learning outcomes for every discipline. When we began asking ourselves what it would take to achieve this on a large scale, questions of sustainability and scalability began to overshadow the accomplishment of ensuring information literacy as a required knowledge base for all undergraduates. With very few guideposts, we decided to establish our own best practices for integrating information literacy into disciplinary ways of thinking, knowing, and researching. A grant from the campus Scholarship of Teaching & Learning initiative and support from the Library funded a study that named librarians and teaching faculty in two separate disciplines as co-investigators in discovering how students understand and practice information seeking within their own field. As subject librarians, we became ambassadors for information literacy as we formed partnerships with these faculty to connect the College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education to their course goals. These collaborations resulted in syllabus redesign, assignment creation, and librarian-faculty co-teaching for three separate courses. Presentation file is hosted off-site at: http://prezi.com/6jbzxecgbcum

Presentation Description

Librarians at Indiana University-Bloomington embraced the announcement for information literacy in the General Education requirements as an opportunity to evolve the instruction program from an ad-hoc, decentralized program into one that is based on measurable and achievable learning outcomes for every discipline. When we began asking ourselves what it would take to achieve this on a large scale, questions of sustainability and scalability began to overshadow the accomplishment of ensuring information literacy as a required knowledge base for all undergraduates. With very few guideposts, we decided to establish our own best practices for integrating information literacy into disciplinary ways of thinking, knowing, and researching.

Keywords

Library instruction, Information literacy, Sustainability, Scalability, Research skills

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 11:30 AM Sep 25th, 12:30 PM

Throw Away the Map: Blazing New Trails between Information Literacy and the Disciplines

Room 218

There have been many approaches to information literacy education at academic institutions, and many positive outcomes from these efforts. Still, there is need for more research, exploration, and professional communication among librarians to identify information literacy teaching methods that have a consistent and long-lasting impact. Librarians at Indiana University-Bloomington embraced the announcement for information literacy in the General Education requirements as an opportunity to evolve the instruction program from an ad-hoc, decentralized program into one that is based on measurable and achievable learning outcomes for every discipline. When we began asking ourselves what it would take to achieve this on a large scale, questions of sustainability and scalability began to overshadow the accomplishment of ensuring information literacy as a required knowledge base for all undergraduates. With very few guideposts, we decided to establish our own best practices for integrating information literacy into disciplinary ways of thinking, knowing, and researching. A grant from the campus Scholarship of Teaching & Learning initiative and support from the Library funded a study that named librarians and teaching faculty in two separate disciplines as co-investigators in discovering how students understand and practice information seeking within their own field. As subject librarians, we became ambassadors for information literacy as we formed partnerships with these faculty to connect the College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education to their course goals. These collaborations resulted in syllabus redesign, assignment creation, and librarian-faculty co-teaching for three separate courses. Presentation file is hosted off-site at: http://prezi.com/6jbzxecgbcum