Location

Room 212

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

The business sector has traditionally evaluated their training and instruction programs on a model that considers 4 levels of success (Kirkpatrick). These levels can be described as success based on 1) appeal, 2) learning outcomes 3) integration of learning into daily work routines, or 4) overall impact on / improvement of the organization. This paper describes how this rubric can be generally, and ideally, translated and applied to instruction programs in libraries to determine what levels of evaluation are attempted by libraries. And, based on a review and analysis of case studies of the literature of library instruction, considers questions including: how frequently do libraries base their evaluation of instruction on student self-reports of the appeal of the instruction and / or how much the student "felt" they learned (level 1)? How frequently, and by what means, do libraries attempt to measure student learning outcomes (level 2) in order to evaluate the instruction? And, in any sense, are the other two levels of evaluation in the rubric used? The results from academic libraries' evaluation of instruction will also be compared with how businesses evaluate their instruction/training for the four levels.

Presentation Description

In this session, the information literacy skills of online graduate students are examined. As students who are physically separated from both the instructor and other students, the online cohort represents a specialized population. For individuals who teach or those who work in libraries or administration, this presentation will provide valuable information about information literacy, the online graduate student and how institutions can better meet their needs.

Keywords

Information literacy, Evaluation methods, Library instruction

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 10:00 AM Sep 25th, 11:15 AM

Assessing the Evaluation of Library Instruction Using a Business Model

Room 212

The business sector has traditionally evaluated their training and instruction programs on a model that considers 4 levels of success (Kirkpatrick). These levels can be described as success based on 1) appeal, 2) learning outcomes 3) integration of learning into daily work routines, or 4) overall impact on / improvement of the organization. This paper describes how this rubric can be generally, and ideally, translated and applied to instruction programs in libraries to determine what levels of evaluation are attempted by libraries. And, based on a review and analysis of case studies of the literature of library instruction, considers questions including: how frequently do libraries base their evaluation of instruction on student self-reports of the appeal of the instruction and / or how much the student "felt" they learned (level 1)? How frequently, and by what means, do libraries attempt to measure student learning outcomes (level 2) in order to evaluate the instruction? And, in any sense, are the other two levels of evaluation in the rubric used? The results from academic libraries' evaluation of instruction will also be compared with how businesses evaluate their instruction/training for the four levels.