Term of Award

Fall 2006

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

James F. Burnham

Committee Member 1

Cordelia D. Zinskie

Committee Member 2

Walter S. Polka

Abstract

The research study on the retention influences of Georgia's secondary career and technical education teachers was conducted to determine why the teachers chose to remain in the teaching profession. Participants included all program areas of career and technical education in the state of Georgia. Data were gathered to analyze the demographics, personal retention influences, and professional retention influences of the career and technical education teachers. The quantitative study was conducted by an on-line survey. Approximately 700 e-mails were sent, and 154 participants responded. Demographic results suggested that the typical career and technical education teacher respondents had 21 plus years of experience, were age 51 to 60, white, non-Hispanic, had a current salary of $46,000, and taught in the business program area. Professional retention influences such as support from administrators, adequate time to complete job responsibilities, pleasant working conditions, students' intellectual growth, resources, salary increases, parental support, professional development, and mentoring were some of the retention influences noted on the survey. Results indicated that support from administrators ranked as the most important retention influence for Georgia's secondary career and technical education teachers. ANOVAs were conducted to determine if there were any relationships between the demographics and professional retention influences. Significant differences were found between years of experience and potential for salary increases, age and watching students grow intellectually, ethnicity and support by peers, and salary and professional associations. Personal retention influences such as inner sense of knowing the teacher is doing a good job, positive interaction with students, and parental support were some of the retention influences noted on the survey. Results indicated that inner sense of knowing the teacher was doing a good job ranked as the most important personal retention influence. ANOVAs were conducted to determine if there were any relationships between the demographics and personal retention influences. A significant difference was found between the program area demographic group and positive interatcion with students and parental support.

Share

COinS