Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Ethnic Minority, Immigrant, Migrant, and Refugee Students’ Experience of Language, Culture, Identity, and Power in P. R. China, South Korea, Africa, and U. S. A.

Titles of Presentations in a Panel

Chair: Ming Fang He, Georgia Southern University

Discussant: Isabel Nuñez, Concordia University Chicago

Presenters: Min Yu, Wayne State University; Michelle Bae-Dimitriadis, SUNY Buffalo State; Wangari Gichiru, Central Connecticut State University; Ming Fang He, Georgia Southern University

Individual Presentations within the Session

Presentation 1: Overview of the Increasingly Multicultural and Multilingual World Landscape and Culturally Relevant Research Methodologies (Ming Fang He, Georgia Southern University)

Presentation 2: Savannah Chinese: Oral Histories of Chinese Immigrants and Their Children’s Experience of Language, Culture, Identity, and Power in Southern U. S. Schools, Communities, and Neighborhoods (Ming Fang He, Georgia Southern University)

Presentation 3: Diasporic Korean Youths’ Liminal Pedagogy through K-Pop (Michelle S. Bae, SUNY Buffalo State)

Presentation 4: The Politics, Practices, and Possibilities of Migrant Children Schools in Contemporary China (Min Yu, Wayne State University)

Presentation 5: Teachers Experiences in Meeting the Educational Needs and Challenges of Somali Refugee Students (Wangari Gichiru, Central Connecticut State University)

Presenter Information

Ming Fang He, mingfhe88Follow

Abstract

In this interactive symposium, a group of international scholars discuss four programs of research in which culturally relevant inquiry methods were used to explore ethnic minority, immigrant, migrant, and refugee students’ experience of language, culture, identity, and power in P. R. China, South Korea, Africa, and the United States. The presenters engage the audience in discussion of research on struggled lives of disenfranchised and marginalized minority, immigrant, migrant, and refugee students in schools, communities, and neighborhoods. These activist researchers allow their participants to name their own predicaments, tell their own stories, ask hard questions, and thrive with challenges and contradictions. They demonstrate practical instantiations and power of educational inquiries for cultivating an invigorating, democratic, and just human condition for all.

Presentation Description

Four international researchers in this interactive symposium explore diverse culturally relevant research programs on ethnic minority, immigrant, migrant, and refugee students, and their power to mobilize teachers, principals, educators, educational policy makers, and educational researchers to improve the education of ethnic minority, immigrant, migrant, and refugee students in an increasingly diversified and contested world.

Keywords

International research, Culturally relevant inquiry methods, Ethnic minority, Immigrant, Migrant, Refugee students’ experience of language, culture, identity, and power in P. R. China, South Korea, Africa, and the United States, and lives of disenfranchised and marginalized minority, immigrant, migrant, Refugee students in schools, Communities, Neighborhoods

Location

Talmadge

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 11th, 9:30 AM Jun 11th, 10:45 AM

Ethnic Minority, Immigrant, Migrant, and Refugee Students’ Experience of Language, Culture, Identity, and Power in P. R. China, South Korea, Africa, and U. S. A.

Talmadge

In this interactive symposium, a group of international scholars discuss four programs of research in which culturally relevant inquiry methods were used to explore ethnic minority, immigrant, migrant, and refugee students’ experience of language, culture, identity, and power in P. R. China, South Korea, Africa, and the United States. The presenters engage the audience in discussion of research on struggled lives of disenfranchised and marginalized minority, immigrant, migrant, and refugee students in schools, communities, and neighborhoods. These activist researchers allow their participants to name their own predicaments, tell their own stories, ask hard questions, and thrive with challenges and contradictions. They demonstrate practical instantiations and power of educational inquiries for cultivating an invigorating, democratic, and just human condition for all.