Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Emotion, Pedagogy, and Curriculum: Teaching in Migrant Children Schools in Urban China

Abstract

Although public concern has increased with regard to the education and welfare issues affecting children of China’s domestic migrant workers in recent years, there is still very limited recognition for the group of people who work and teach in the schools mainly serve migrant children. This inquiry focuses on four teachers from different migrant children schools. Their experiences represent different philosophies of teaching and reflect various types of pedagogical practices in migrant children schools. To some degree, all these teachers struggle with being a teacher in migrant children schools. Their different approaches to teaching and various adoption of curriculum represent how teachers in migrant children schools are trying to make sense of who they are and whom they are working with. The purpose of this inquiry is to analyze how different social relations and structural factors influence the dynamics of migrant children schools and the society at large, as well as examining the factors influence teachers’ identities and their sociocultural-constructed philosophies of teaching that have been made “invisible,” both socially and culturally. I argue that curriculum is enacted and created and teachers’ emotion is situated and structured. It is particularly crucial to recognize the complex relationships between emotion, pedagogy, and curriculum in country like China with rigorous national curriculum and places like migrant children schools where curriculum issues would normally be considered as less important as daily survival.

Presentation Description

This inquiry focuses on four teachers from different migrant children schools. Their different approaches to teaching and various adoption of curriculum represent how teachers in migrant children schools are trying to make sense of who they are and whom they are working with. The purpose of this inquiry is to analyze how different social relations and structural factors influence the dynamics of migrant children schools and the society at large, as well as examining the factors influence teachers’ identities and their sociocultural-constructed philosophies of teaching that have been made “invisible,” both socially and culturally.

Keywords

Migrant Teachers, Emotion, Pedagogy, Curriculum

Location

Forsyth

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 9th, 2:15 PM Jun 9th, 3:30 PM

Emotion, Pedagogy, and Curriculum: Teaching in Migrant Children Schools in Urban China

Forsyth

Although public concern has increased with regard to the education and welfare issues affecting children of China’s domestic migrant workers in recent years, there is still very limited recognition for the group of people who work and teach in the schools mainly serve migrant children. This inquiry focuses on four teachers from different migrant children schools. Their experiences represent different philosophies of teaching and reflect various types of pedagogical practices in migrant children schools. To some degree, all these teachers struggle with being a teacher in migrant children schools. Their different approaches to teaching and various adoption of curriculum represent how teachers in migrant children schools are trying to make sense of who they are and whom they are working with. The purpose of this inquiry is to analyze how different social relations and structural factors influence the dynamics of migrant children schools and the society at large, as well as examining the factors influence teachers’ identities and their sociocultural-constructed philosophies of teaching that have been made “invisible,” both socially and culturally. I argue that curriculum is enacted and created and teachers’ emotion is situated and structured. It is particularly crucial to recognize the complex relationships between emotion, pedagogy, and curriculum in country like China with rigorous national curriculum and places like migrant children schools where curriculum issues would normally be considered as less important as daily survival.