Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Counternarratives of Curriculum in Schools, Neighborhoods, and Communities in the South

Titles of Presentations in a Panel

Individual Presentations Within the Session:

Specifically, we will explore the following diverse forms of curriculum inquiry:

Presentation #1:

Counternarratives of Curriculum in Schools, Neighborhoods, and Communities in the South: Pushing Methodological Boundaries

Ming Fang He and Sabrina Ross, Georgia Southern University

Presentation #2:

From the Big House to the School House: Slavery by a Different Name: # School: The Metaphorical Plantation

Samantha Awala (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: “Samantha Awala”)

Presentation #3:

Curriculum Between Borders ~ Research for the Pulled Out, Tempered, and Put Back In~Critical Geography and Critical Disability Studies

Kristen Denney (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: “Kristen Denney” )

Presentation #4:

Curriculum of Place: Critical Geographical Currere

Anna Waddell (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: "Anna Waddell" aw03960@georgiasouthern.edu)

Presentation #5:

Revolutionary Solitude: Teachers as Public Intellectuals

Stacey Brown (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: “Stacey Brown < stacey.brown@ccboe.net >)


Presentation #6:

Critical Race Oral Histories of A Black School in Georgia

Marquez Hall (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: “Marquez Hall” )

Presentation #7:

Counternarratives of the Education of Blacks in the U. S. South: Critical Race Narrative

Kimberly L. Hollis (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: "Kimberly Hollis" )

Presentation #8:

Memoir of a Mad Teacher: Womanist Currere:

Alexine Holmes (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: Alexine Holmes )

Presentation #9:

Research on the Lived Experience of Chinese International Students at a Non-Research I University in the U. S. South

Yiming Jin (TA & Doctoral Fellow in Curriculum Studies; Email: Yiming Jin, or )

Presentation #10:

A Federalized Southerner: A “Furner” in a Native Land

James Mark Mohr (Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: James Mark Mohr <jm05674@georgiasouthern.edu>)

Presentation #11:

A Memoir: Being Mixed, Black and Filipino, and Multiracial in the U. S. South.

Michael Williams (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: “Michael Williams” mw04697@georgiasouthern.edu)

Presentation #12:

Schooled to Profit? A Dark Comedy--Art of Fiction in Research on Life in Schools in an Era of Accountability, Standardization, and Commodification

Nicole Nolasco (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: “Nicole Nolasco” nbrants@gmail.com)

Presentation #13:

Life is a Manifesto: Composing a Memoir to Invent the Counternarratives of a Teacher in an Era of Accountability, Standardization, and Commodification

Angela Pieniaszek (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: Angela Pieniaszek )

Presentation #14:

A Critical Counter-Narrative Inquiry into the Curriculum of Exclusion of Students with Significant Disabilities in One Rural Elementary School in Georgia

Christy Howard (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: Christy Howard <ch07221@georgiasouthern.edu>)

Presentation #15:

Awakening of Blackness: The Power of Self-Identification as a Black Man in a Multiracial World

Michael Williams (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: “Michael Williams” mw04697@georgiasouthern.edu)

Presentation #16:

“Ain’t I a Teacher?” Examining the Seats of Power for Black Women Educators

Dawn Whipple (Teacher & Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum Studies; Email: Dawn Whipple <dw04589@georgiasouthern.edu>)


Presenter Information

Ming Fang He, mingfhe88Follow

Abstract

This is a continuation of dialogue on pushing methodological boundaries as we continue to research on the counternarratives of curriculum of schools, neighborhoods, and communities in the U. S. South. We explore creative ways to push methodological and representational boundaries to liberate dissertation writing by diving into life and writing into contradiction in schools, families, and communities in the U. S. South. Through visual/graphic/multimedia presentations, reader’s theater, spoken word, drama, and performance, the presenters will illustrate diverse forms of dissertation research and representations such as critical race narrative inquiry, critical geography/critical dis/ability studies, critical multiracial/mixed racial fictional auto/biographical inquiry, multiperspectival poetic inquiry, multiperspectival cultural studies, womanist currere, critical portraiture, memoir, fiction, oral history, documentary film, and painting. Innovative writings engendered from the inquiries will be demonstrated. Potentials, challenges, and future directions of creative inquiries and representations will be discussed.

There are three purposes to this session. One purpose of this presentation is to share our experience of moving beyond methodological and representational boundaries to liberate dissertation writing by diving into life and writing into contradiction in schools, families, and communities in the U. S. South. The other purpose is to explore creative ways to engage in and write about research and embed inquiry in school, neighborhood, and community life to transform research into positive social and educational change. Another purpose is to engage the audience from diverse research paradigms in discussions on how diverse forms of curriculum inquiry and modes of representation and expression help “examine the meaning of language, culture, and heritage in educational research and praxis;” capture cultural, linguistic, and socio-political poetics of personal, community, and historical narrative; address pressing issues and contemporary concerns; make impact on practice, policy, and historical, social, political, economic, geographical, cultural, linguistic, and ecological contexts; and advance curriculum theorizing toward social justice. The potentials, challenges, and future directions of various inquiries and representations are also discussed.

We begin with an overview of convergence and divergence of forms of curriculum inquiry and modes of representation and expression with the intent to imagine and recognize possibilities to push methodological and representational boundaries to liberate dissertation writing. We then invigorate exploratory conversations on forms of inquiry modes of representation and expression that challenge traditional ways of engaging in, interpreting, and writing about research. We invite curriculum inquirers to engage in activist oriented research and writing, transcend inquiry boundaries, raise challenging questions, transgress orthodoxy and dogma, and research silenced narratives of underrepresented or disenfranchised individuals and groups with hearts and minds (Ayers, 2004, 2006; He & Ayers, 2008; hooks, 1994, 2003) to build a long term and heart felt participatory movement to promote cultural, linguistic, and ecological diversity and flourishing plurality of humanity (Schubert, 2009).

The power of such inquiries and representations lies in its potential to locate experience within complex social, cultural, and linguistic contexts and enable researchers to dive into life and write into contradiction. Such inquiries and representations enable the researchers to develop a deeper understanding of cultural research phenomena, inquiry contexts, modes of inquiry, forms of representation, and possible educational and social changes engendered by research and writing. Such inquiries and representations thrive on the passionate involvement, commitment and advocacy of the researchers, and help cultivate hope and possibilities for better lives as experienced in diverse schools, families, and communities.

Presentation Description

This is a continuation of dialogue on pushing methodological boundaries as we continue to research on the counternarratives of curriculum of schools, neighborhoods, and communities in the U. S. South. We explore creative ways to push methodological and representational boundaries to liberate dissertation writing by diving into life and writing into contradiction in schools, families, and communities in the U. S. South. Through visual/graphic/multimedia presentations, reader’s theater, spoken word, drama, and performance, the presenters will illustrate diverse forms of dissertation research and representations such as critical race narrative inquiry, critical geography/critical dis/ability studies, critical multiracial/mixed racial fictional auto/biographical inquiry, multiperspectival poetic inquiry, multiperspectival cultural studies, womanist currere, critical portraiture, memoir, fiction, oral history, documentary film, and painting. Innovative writings engendered from the inquiries will be demonstrated. Potentials, challenges, and future directions of creative inquiries and representations will be discussed.

Keywords

Pushing methodological boundaries, Counternarratives of curriculum, Schools, Neighborhoods, Communities in the U. S. South

Location

Talmadge

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 9th, 11:00 AM Jun 9th, 12:15 PM

Counternarratives of Curriculum in Schools, Neighborhoods, and Communities in the South

Talmadge

This is a continuation of dialogue on pushing methodological boundaries as we continue to research on the counternarratives of curriculum of schools, neighborhoods, and communities in the U. S. South. We explore creative ways to push methodological and representational boundaries to liberate dissertation writing by diving into life and writing into contradiction in schools, families, and communities in the U. S. South. Through visual/graphic/multimedia presentations, reader’s theater, spoken word, drama, and performance, the presenters will illustrate diverse forms of dissertation research and representations such as critical race narrative inquiry, critical geography/critical dis/ability studies, critical multiracial/mixed racial fictional auto/biographical inquiry, multiperspectival poetic inquiry, multiperspectival cultural studies, womanist currere, critical portraiture, memoir, fiction, oral history, documentary film, and painting. Innovative writings engendered from the inquiries will be demonstrated. Potentials, challenges, and future directions of creative inquiries and representations will be discussed.

There are three purposes to this session. One purpose of this presentation is to share our experience of moving beyond methodological and representational boundaries to liberate dissertation writing by diving into life and writing into contradiction in schools, families, and communities in the U. S. South. The other purpose is to explore creative ways to engage in and write about research and embed inquiry in school, neighborhood, and community life to transform research into positive social and educational change. Another purpose is to engage the audience from diverse research paradigms in discussions on how diverse forms of curriculum inquiry and modes of representation and expression help “examine the meaning of language, culture, and heritage in educational research and praxis;” capture cultural, linguistic, and socio-political poetics of personal, community, and historical narrative; address pressing issues and contemporary concerns; make impact on practice, policy, and historical, social, political, economic, geographical, cultural, linguistic, and ecological contexts; and advance curriculum theorizing toward social justice. The potentials, challenges, and future directions of various inquiries and representations are also discussed.

We begin with an overview of convergence and divergence of forms of curriculum inquiry and modes of representation and expression with the intent to imagine and recognize possibilities to push methodological and representational boundaries to liberate dissertation writing. We then invigorate exploratory conversations on forms of inquiry modes of representation and expression that challenge traditional ways of engaging in, interpreting, and writing about research. We invite curriculum inquirers to engage in activist oriented research and writing, transcend inquiry boundaries, raise challenging questions, transgress orthodoxy and dogma, and research silenced narratives of underrepresented or disenfranchised individuals and groups with hearts and minds (Ayers, 2004, 2006; He & Ayers, 2008; hooks, 1994, 2003) to build a long term and heart felt participatory movement to promote cultural, linguistic, and ecological diversity and flourishing plurality of humanity (Schubert, 2009).

The power of such inquiries and representations lies in its potential to locate experience within complex social, cultural, and linguistic contexts and enable researchers to dive into life and write into contradiction. Such inquiries and representations enable the researchers to develop a deeper understanding of cultural research phenomena, inquiry contexts, modes of inquiry, forms of representation, and possible educational and social changes engendered by research and writing. Such inquiries and representations thrive on the passionate involvement, commitment and advocacy of the researchers, and help cultivate hope and possibilities for better lives as experienced in diverse schools, families, and communities.