Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Out in the Country: Studies in Critical Rural Education

Titles of Presentations in a Panel

Myles Horton and the Highlander Folk School: An Enduring Exemplar of Rural Education for Democracy (Lake)

Teaching in the Country: A Critical Analysis of the Experiences of Rural Teachers in Jamaica and the United States (Blair)

"Fat Guys in the Woods Naked and Afraid:Rural Reality T.V. as Prep-School for a Post-Apocalyptic World" (Beech & Guy)

Barriers Encountered by the Migrant Hispanic Student in Rural Education (Taylor)

Country Critical: Rural Education in the 21st Century. (Reynolds)




Abstract

This panel critically investigates and informs the construction of the rural, rural identity and the understanding of the rural internationally. The panel will develop and expand the notion of critical understandings of rural education particularly in the areas of race, class, gender, with conceptualizations of social justice. Presenters will discuss issues raised in the study of critical rural education. The first presenter explores the formation, present and future of The Highlander Folk School through written and oral histories and interviews that exemplify radical compassion and faith in human ability to think, act and be together in ways that changed the landscape of the rural American South and beyond. The experiences of rural teachers in both Jamaica and the United States are discussed within a critical theoretical framework that examines the significance of place in the lives of these teachers. A cross-cultural analysis of rural teachers highlights common elements of the rural experience that transcend cultural stereotypes. These ideas comprise a second presentation. Another presentation examines how a cultural obsession with the post-apocalypse--whether Biblical or germ warfare (think Walking Dead)--is driving middle-class urban folks to desire what might be called rural, working-class knowledge. A fourth presentation explores the dynamics of rural education as it exists within the interplay of culture, politics, and powerful literacy and are explicated in the educational barriers faced by Hispanic migrant students. The final presentation discusses critical conceptualizations of rural education and the ways in which the presenters deal with those conceptualizations.

Presentation Description

This panel critically investigates and informs the construction of the rural, rural identity and the understanding of the rural internationally. The presentations will explore and expand the notion of critical understandings of rural education particularly in the areas of race, class, gender, within conceptualizations of social justice.

Keywords

Critical Rural Education

Location

Oglethorpe Room

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 11th, 12:00 PM Jun 11th, 1:45 PM

Out in the Country: Studies in Critical Rural Education

Oglethorpe Room

This panel critically investigates and informs the construction of the rural, rural identity and the understanding of the rural internationally. The panel will develop and expand the notion of critical understandings of rural education particularly in the areas of race, class, gender, with conceptualizations of social justice. Presenters will discuss issues raised in the study of critical rural education. The first presenter explores the formation, present and future of The Highlander Folk School through written and oral histories and interviews that exemplify radical compassion and faith in human ability to think, act and be together in ways that changed the landscape of the rural American South and beyond. The experiences of rural teachers in both Jamaica and the United States are discussed within a critical theoretical framework that examines the significance of place in the lives of these teachers. A cross-cultural analysis of rural teachers highlights common elements of the rural experience that transcend cultural stereotypes. These ideas comprise a second presentation. Another presentation examines how a cultural obsession with the post-apocalypse--whether Biblical or germ warfare (think Walking Dead)--is driving middle-class urban folks to desire what might be called rural, working-class knowledge. A fourth presentation explores the dynamics of rural education as it exists within the interplay of culture, politics, and powerful literacy and are explicated in the educational barriers faced by Hispanic migrant students. The final presentation discusses critical conceptualizations of rural education and the ways in which the presenters deal with those conceptualizations.