Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Personal Recollections of William H. Schubert and Edmund C. Short: Curriculum Dialogues on Georgia Southern University's new Historical Collections & the History of Curriculum Studies

Abstract

In view of the fact that Professor Short and Professor Schubert have donated their curriculum studies collections to the Zach S. Henderson Library for purposes of assisting scholarship on the history of curriculum studies, this session is proposed as a glimpse at the kind of resources made available through the two collections. Thus, it is therefore proposed that Dr. Schubert and Dr. Short constitute a panel that could be available once or twice during the Conference to advance the study of curriculum history and oral history of the Curriculum Studies Field. Their commentaries will be moderated by Dr. James C. Jupp of Georgia Southern University.

Here are samples of the questions that might be channeled through the panel:

1. With what noted curriculum scholars of the past have you worked with, and what were they like as professors? Bill Schubert might discuss J. Harlan Shores, Harry S. Broudy, William F. Connell, J. Myron Atkin, Bernard Spodek, Louis J. Rubin and others at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, or at Northwestern University (George Beauchamp), at Indiana University (A. Stafford Clayton, Stanley E. Ballinger, Malcolm Skilbeck, Philip G. Smith, or Michael Scriven). Or he might speak of curriculum colleagues at the Unviersity of Illinois at Chicago, such as Bill Ayers, Bill Watkins (also Schubert’s doctoral student), Harriet Talmage, Maruice Eash, or Herbert Walberg). Edmund Short could comment on Florence Stratemeyer, Alice Miel, Lawrence Cremin, Arno Bellack, Philip Phenix, Gordon Mackenzie, Arthur W. Foshay, Maxine Greene, Dwayne Huebner, Harry Passow, among others at Teachers College, Columbia, and fellow curriculum scholars at Pennsylvania State University, such as Dan Marshall, Henry Giroux, Joe Kincheloe, Murry Nelson, Madhu Prakash.

2. Who are some of the many scholars you have known in the field over the years? The audience might raise particular questions about contributions of scholars Short or Schubert have known over the years. Such scholars as Ralph Tyler, Hollis Caswell, Paul Klohr, James B. Macdonald, Louise Berman, Philip Jackson, J. Galen Saylor, William Alexander, Daniel Tanner, Laurel Tanner, Benjamin Bloom, Harold Shane, Elliot Eisner, Maxine Greene, John Goodlad, O.L. Davis, Herbert Kliebard or more recent scholars such as Michael Apple, Max van Manen, Janet Miller, William Pinar, Madeleine Grumet, Decker Walker, Frances Klein, F. Michael Connelly, Robert Bullough, Jr., Norman Overly, James T. Sears, David Hansen, Craig Kridel, and a host of others.

3. What are stories from early conferences of AERA, AESA, Bergamo (and its earlier counterparts), Curriculum and Pedagogy, American Association of Teaching and Curriculum, Professors of Curriculum, The Society for the Study of Curriculum History, the Society of Professors of Education, and many others?

4. What does participation in such organizations mean to your careers and to those involve.

5. Can you tell stories about some of the key books in the field? Perhaps we could learn from your perspectives on their creation, uses, interpretations, or miss-interpretations.

6. What can you tell us about the influence of curriculum scholars on one another and the developments of mentoring or collaboration and contestation over the years in the field?

7. Would you share perspectives on connections between curriculum innovations and curriculum scholarship? Particular stories would be intriguing.

Presentation Description

This session draws on the personal and professional memories of William H. Schubert and Edmund C. Short in advancing historical curriculum dialogues. The session will be moderated by James C. Jupp

Keywords

Curriculum history, Oral history, William H. Schubert, Edmund C. Short, Intellectual history

Location

Magnolia Room A

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 12th, 2:00 PM Jun 12th, 3:15 PM

Personal Recollections of William H. Schubert and Edmund C. Short: Curriculum Dialogues on Georgia Southern University's new Historical Collections & the History of Curriculum Studies

Magnolia Room A

In view of the fact that Professor Short and Professor Schubert have donated their curriculum studies collections to the Zach S. Henderson Library for purposes of assisting scholarship on the history of curriculum studies, this session is proposed as a glimpse at the kind of resources made available through the two collections. Thus, it is therefore proposed that Dr. Schubert and Dr. Short constitute a panel that could be available once or twice during the Conference to advance the study of curriculum history and oral history of the Curriculum Studies Field. Their commentaries will be moderated by Dr. James C. Jupp of Georgia Southern University.

Here are samples of the questions that might be channeled through the panel:

1. With what noted curriculum scholars of the past have you worked with, and what were they like as professors? Bill Schubert might discuss J. Harlan Shores, Harry S. Broudy, William F. Connell, J. Myron Atkin, Bernard Spodek, Louis J. Rubin and others at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, or at Northwestern University (George Beauchamp), at Indiana University (A. Stafford Clayton, Stanley E. Ballinger, Malcolm Skilbeck, Philip G. Smith, or Michael Scriven). Or he might speak of curriculum colleagues at the Unviersity of Illinois at Chicago, such as Bill Ayers, Bill Watkins (also Schubert’s doctoral student), Harriet Talmage, Maruice Eash, or Herbert Walberg). Edmund Short could comment on Florence Stratemeyer, Alice Miel, Lawrence Cremin, Arno Bellack, Philip Phenix, Gordon Mackenzie, Arthur W. Foshay, Maxine Greene, Dwayne Huebner, Harry Passow, among others at Teachers College, Columbia, and fellow curriculum scholars at Pennsylvania State University, such as Dan Marshall, Henry Giroux, Joe Kincheloe, Murry Nelson, Madhu Prakash.

2. Who are some of the many scholars you have known in the field over the years? The audience might raise particular questions about contributions of scholars Short or Schubert have known over the years. Such scholars as Ralph Tyler, Hollis Caswell, Paul Klohr, James B. Macdonald, Louise Berman, Philip Jackson, J. Galen Saylor, William Alexander, Daniel Tanner, Laurel Tanner, Benjamin Bloom, Harold Shane, Elliot Eisner, Maxine Greene, John Goodlad, O.L. Davis, Herbert Kliebard or more recent scholars such as Michael Apple, Max van Manen, Janet Miller, William Pinar, Madeleine Grumet, Decker Walker, Frances Klein, F. Michael Connelly, Robert Bullough, Jr., Norman Overly, James T. Sears, David Hansen, Craig Kridel, and a host of others.

3. What are stories from early conferences of AERA, AESA, Bergamo (and its earlier counterparts), Curriculum and Pedagogy, American Association of Teaching and Curriculum, Professors of Curriculum, The Society for the Study of Curriculum History, the Society of Professors of Education, and many others?

4. What does participation in such organizations mean to your careers and to those involve.

5. Can you tell stories about some of the key books in the field? Perhaps we could learn from your perspectives on their creation, uses, interpretations, or miss-interpretations.

6. What can you tell us about the influence of curriculum scholars on one another and the developments of mentoring or collaboration and contestation over the years in the field?

7. Would you share perspectives on connections between curriculum innovations and curriculum scholarship? Particular stories would be intriguing.