Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Taking it to the Streets: Foregrounding the Interventions Handbook on Advocacy and Activism in Curriculum Studies

Titles of Presentations in a Panel

Mothering while Black in the Academy (Guillory)

Decolonial Philosophy of Praxis: Resituating ‘activism’ in curriculum studies (Jaramillo)

Data Dumping: Shifting of the Modes of Struggle in Curriculum Studies (Malewski)

“In Relation”: The Radical Act of Curriculum as Theological Text (Whitlock)


Abstract

The question of relevancy has marked scholarship in the field of Curriculum Studies since the publication of Ralph Tyler’s Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction in 1949. This panel addresses the question of relevancy through a critical examination of activism and advocacy, with a particular focus on how scholars conceive of and carry out curriculum interventions. With the contemporary emphasis on higher education for economic development, this panel is timely in its efforts to displace dominant perspectives regarding what makes for robust educational experiences and worthy being, knowing, and doing in this world. Drawing from perspectives that include Black feminist perspectives and decolonizing pedagogy to research methods and theology, panelists explore their conceptions and practices related to efforts to shift the thinking that gets thought and lives that get lived when curriculum is read, spoke, imagined, and enacted. Unique to this panel, authors dispel narrow conceptions of advocacy and activism and lay their hopes, dreams, successes, disappointments, and failures on the line toward fuller understandings of ethics, responsibilities, agendas, and commitments. Foregrounding a handbook focused on tri-partite readings, panelists explore initial chapters, ones that will be set in dialogue with response essays that are juxtaposed in section chapters that examine themes and connections, disjunctures and breakdowns. Attendees will have an opportunity to explore the beginnings of an interdisciplinary handbook, a collection of essential readings on the question of what makes education meaningful and relevant and how change gets made in public and higher education.

Presentation Description

Foregrounding a handbook focused on activism and advocacy in curriculum studies, this panel explores four takes on transformation, agency, and self and other revelation. Against efforts to make all that is anything in higher education economic development, we address relevancy and applicability in the midst of breakdowns over the place of public in public higher education.

Keywords

Activism, Advocacy, Curriculum, Democracy, Public sphere

Location

Magnolia Room A

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 13th, 2:00 PM Jun 13th, 3:15 PM

Taking it to the Streets: Foregrounding the Interventions Handbook on Advocacy and Activism in Curriculum Studies

Magnolia Room A

The question of relevancy has marked scholarship in the field of Curriculum Studies since the publication of Ralph Tyler’s Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction in 1949. This panel addresses the question of relevancy through a critical examination of activism and advocacy, with a particular focus on how scholars conceive of and carry out curriculum interventions. With the contemporary emphasis on higher education for economic development, this panel is timely in its efforts to displace dominant perspectives regarding what makes for robust educational experiences and worthy being, knowing, and doing in this world. Drawing from perspectives that include Black feminist perspectives and decolonizing pedagogy to research methods and theology, panelists explore their conceptions and practices related to efforts to shift the thinking that gets thought and lives that get lived when curriculum is read, spoke, imagined, and enacted. Unique to this panel, authors dispel narrow conceptions of advocacy and activism and lay their hopes, dreams, successes, disappointments, and failures on the line toward fuller understandings of ethics, responsibilities, agendas, and commitments. Foregrounding a handbook focused on tri-partite readings, panelists explore initial chapters, ones that will be set in dialogue with response essays that are juxtaposed in section chapters that examine themes and connections, disjunctures and breakdowns. Attendees will have an opportunity to explore the beginnings of an interdisciplinary handbook, a collection of essential readings on the question of what makes education meaningful and relevant and how change gets made in public and higher education.