Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Blending Cultures, Identities in Transition: Nursing Students from African Countries in a South Georgia University

Abstract

The United States is one of the top host countries for international students, including thousands from African countries. Many African-born international students enter our undergraduate nursing program in Southeast Georgia, but struggle to be successful once they are admitted. The challenges faced by international students in the U. S. are well documented, and studies have shown that the barriers are even greater for students from Africa than for other international students, due to the vast differences between their cultural backgrounds and our U. S. culture. When those students are also Black, they may also face discrimination and prejudice in this country. As the student body becomes increasingly internationally diverse in this Southeast Georgia nursing program, it is imperative that the nursing faculty learn about the cultural clashes faced by these students, and to understand how the students’ cultural backgrounds and worldviews impact their experiences. This study will seek to construct meaning from the lived experiences of African-born international nursing students at a predominantly White university in Southeast Georgia, and give voice to the students by presenting the results in their own words, providing insight into their experiences. African-born international students enter the classroom with their own cultural beliefs and worldviews already in place, just as we do. It is up to faculty to make connections with students, and seek to understand their needs. Culturally responsive teachers are open to learning from their students from diverse backgrounds, and are willing to adjust their pedagogy and curriculum accordingly, as needed.

Presentation Description

This study seeks to understand and construct meaning from the lived experiences of African-born international nursing students studying at a Southeast Georgia, predominantly White university, by giving voice to the students and presenting the data in their own words. The challenges and barriers that these students must overcome in order to be successful may be even more substantial than for other international students, because of the vast differences between African culture and U. S. culture. Because these students are also Black, they may face additional challenges.

Keywords

Barriers, Challenges, Discrimination, Culturally responsive teaching

Location

Magnolia Room B

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 13th, 2:00 PM Jun 13th, 3:15 PM

Blending Cultures, Identities in Transition: Nursing Students from African Countries in a South Georgia University

Magnolia Room B

The United States is one of the top host countries for international students, including thousands from African countries. Many African-born international students enter our undergraduate nursing program in Southeast Georgia, but struggle to be successful once they are admitted. The challenges faced by international students in the U. S. are well documented, and studies have shown that the barriers are even greater for students from Africa than for other international students, due to the vast differences between their cultural backgrounds and our U. S. culture. When those students are also Black, they may also face discrimination and prejudice in this country. As the student body becomes increasingly internationally diverse in this Southeast Georgia nursing program, it is imperative that the nursing faculty learn about the cultural clashes faced by these students, and to understand how the students’ cultural backgrounds and worldviews impact their experiences. This study will seek to construct meaning from the lived experiences of African-born international nursing students at a predominantly White university in Southeast Georgia, and give voice to the students by presenting the results in their own words, providing insight into their experiences. African-born international students enter the classroom with their own cultural beliefs and worldviews already in place, just as we do. It is up to faculty to make connections with students, and seek to understand their needs. Culturally responsive teachers are open to learning from their students from diverse backgrounds, and are willing to adjust their pedagogy and curriculum accordingly, as needed.